News and Features

What's going on in the Central Piedmont community and what Central Piedmont is doing in the community.

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus: Governor Cooper announced new face covering requirements

    North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper announced a new set of face covering requirements today, calling them the state’s “best weapon” against a “dire” spread of COVID-19.

    He said the state now has 20 counties considered “red,” where “critical spread” is occurring, under the state’s coronavirus alert system — double what it was when the color-coded alerts were introduced just last week.

    Governor Cooper said his new executive order requires wearing a mask at home when friends are over as well as all public settings, including when at work, the gym, stores, and schools. The order also adds to business’ role in making sure customers wear masks inside stores and keep six feet apart. The new executive order goes into effect at 5 p.m., on Nov. 25, and runs through at least Dec. 11.

    Thanksgiving is this Thursday, and the state is under Phase 3 of reopening and restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Indoor gatherings are limited to 10 people unless they are part of the same household. Outdoor gatherings are limited to 50 persons, however; face coverings must be worn outdoors if persons do not keep at least six feet from non-­household members.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has strongly advised people to stay home for the holiday. North Carolina does not have travel restrictions.

    Governor Cooper and Dr. Mandy Cohen, N.C. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary, also urge people to celebrate Thanksgiving with safety precautions, including small groups, eating outside, social distancing of at least six feet with people outside your household, washing hands frequently and wearing a mask.

    Last week, NCDHHS unveiled a new alert system that shows different color-coded levels of yellow, orange, and red to represent COVID-19 hotspots by county. The levels include different suggestions for how the counties can curb the spread of COVID-19. Read more about the new system in this Charlotte Observer article​. Mecklenburg County currently is coded yellow, which indicates “significant” spread. However, counties surrounding Mecklenburg are shown as orange (substantial spread) and red (critical spread).

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus: Governor Cooper extends phase 3 until at least December 4

    North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper announced earlier today Phase 3 of statewide COVID-19 pandemic restrictions will remain in effect until at least December 4.

    With Thanksgiving two weeks away, Governor Cooper said everyone in North Carolina must focus on keeping themselves and their friends and neighbors safe. “We are on shaky ground as we head into Thanksgiving,” Cooper said. “We must avoid getting together especially indoors.”

    Cooper announced a new executive order that reduces the limit on indoor gatherings from 25 people to only 10. It will go into effect on Friday, November 13, and will be in place through Friday, December 4.

    The NC Dept. of Health & Human Services reported 2,582 new cases today.

    In Phase 3, which began Oct. 2, bars, entertainment venues, movie theaters, and large outdoor venues were allowed to reopen with firm capacity restrictions.

    How Central Piedmont is Responding during Coronavirus

    Central Piedmont is currently offering courses in multiple formats — online, hybrid, blended, and face-to-face. (Hybrid and blended courses include both online and some face-to-face instruction.) Central Piedmont continues to follow the state's in-person guidelines that apply to higher education.

    For students who attend classes on campus, please read the Student Guide to Returning to Campus carefully. It is important you continue to follow all of the safety practices detailed in the guide. These include wearing a face covering, keeping a social distance from others, washing your hands frequently, self-monitoring for possible COVID-19 symptoms, and staying home if you feel ill at all.

    Employees are encouraged to read the Guide for Returning to Campus to learn how to best keep themselves, their teammates and students as healthy and safe as possible.

    Registration for the spring 2021 semester is now open. A complete listing of spring 2021 classes, including details such as section, prerequisites, course descriptions, etc., are now available through Student Planning. Log into MyCollege to plan your class schedule. In addition, Corporate and Continuing Education course registration is ongoing. 

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus: Governor Cooper Extends Phase 3 Until at Least Nov. 13

    North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper announced earlier today Phase 3 of statewide coronavirus restrictions will remain in effect until at least Nov. 13.

    In Phase 3, which began Oct. 2, bars, entertainment venues, movie theaters, and large outdoor venues were allowed to reopen with capacity restrictions. Capacity limits remained in place for restaurants, and mass gatherings were limited as well — 25 for indoors and 50 for outdoors.

    How Central Piedmont is Responding during Coronavirus

    Central Piedmont is offering courses in multiple formats — online, hybrid, blended, and face-to-face. (Hybrid and blended courses include both online and some face-to-face instruction.)

    For students who attend classes on campus, please read the Student Guide to Returning to Campus carefully. It is important you continue to follow all of the safety practices detailed in the guide. These include wearing a face covering, keeping a social distance from others, washing your hands frequently, self-monitoring for possible COVID-19 symptoms, and staying home if you feel ill at all.

    Employees are encouraged to read the Guide for Returning to Campus to learn how to best keep yourselves, your teammates and students as healthy and safe as possible.

    Registration for the spring 2021 semester begins Nov. 9. In addition, registration for Corporate and Continuing Education courses is ongoing. A complete listing of spring 2021 classes, including details such as section, prerequisites, and course descriptions are now available through Student Planning. Log into MyCollege to plan your class schedule. When it is the date/time of your priority registration, select "Register Now" to complete the registration process. 

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus: Governor Cooper Moves State to Phase 3

    North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper announced earlier today the state will move into Phase 3 of easing COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. Phase 3 will go into effect Friday, Oct. 2, at 5 p.m.

     Under phase 3:

    • Movie theaters and conference centers can operate at 30% capacity or 100 people, whichever is less.
    • Bars may operate at 30% outdoor capacity or 100 people, whichever is less.
    • Small outdoor venues that hold fewer than 10,000 people can operate at 30% capacity or 100 people, whichever is less.
    • Large outdoor venues that hold 10,000 or more can operate at 7% capacity.
    • Outdoor amusement parks can operate at 30% capacity.

     Among the continued requirements:

    • Face coverings remain mandatory for people over age 5.
    • Mass gatherings remain limited to 25 people indoors and 50 people outdoors.
    • The existing alcohol curfew is extended.

    The college continues to offer its fall classes in multiple formats – online, hybrid, blended, and face-to-face. (Hybrid and blended courses include both online and some face-to-face instruction.)  Short session fall classes begin Oct. 14, and Nov. 11.

    For students who attend classes on campus, please read the Student Guide to Returning to Campus carefully. It’s important you follow all of the safety practices detailed in the guide. These include wearing a face covering, keeping a social distance from others, washing your hands frequently, self-monitoring for possible COVID-19 symptoms, and staying home if you feel ill at all.

    Employees are encouraged to read the Guide for Returning to Campus to learn how to best keep their teammates and students as healthy and safe as possible going forward.

    Class registration for fall term is ongoing through Nov. 10. Continuing Education Registration is ongoing until all seats are filled. 

    Thank you for all that you continue to do to keep our community safe and healthy during this unprecedented time.

  • Small Business Center to offer two free webinar series this fall

    To help small businesses navigate any startup and/or growth challenges they are experiencing during the current COVID-19 pandemic, Central Piedmont Community College’s Small Business Center is offering two free webinar series this fall focused on “HVAC business development” and “non-profit capacity building post-COVID.”

    HVAC Business Development Series
    The demand for heating and air-conditioning services is anticipated to increase over the next five years with industry revenue forecasted to increase from $84 billion to $100 billion. This is an ideal time to plan entry into the industry. Technicians thinking about striking out on their own will find value in this series, which will equip them with the business skills needed to transition from a technician to small business owner. This series is designed for individuals with existing skills and licenses to start a business, as well as those interested in gaining the business skills to one day obtain the necessary industry certificates and licenses.

    Post-COVID Non-Profit Series

    This timely series will cover new ground and provide specific strategies to leverage during this era of social isolation. Attendees will discover how to elevate their board, find donors and dollars, and make virtual fundraising work for them. The series will be led by John Curtis, Ph.D., founder of IOD, Inc., and is tailored to help local nonprofit founders excel in the marketplace.

    Small business owners interested in enrolling in one of the above sessions are encouraged to register early; slots fill quickly. For more information or questions, email renee.hode@cpcc.edu.

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus: State Health Department App to Help Slow the Spread of COVID-19

    The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) has launched the SlowCOVIDNC Exposure Notification App to help slow the spread of COVID-19 across the state.

    The NCDHHS hopes college students and college employees statewide will download the app, which seeks to proactively notify students, faculty, and staff about potential exposure to the coronavirus so they may act quickly to protect themselves and their communities.

    The NCDHHS believes the more people who use the SlowCOVIDNC app, the more effective campuses and communities across the state will be in slowing the spread of COVID-19.

    For download instructions and or to learn more about the SlowCOVIDNC Exposure Notification App and its privacy protections, please visit: https://covid19.ncdhhs.gov/slowcovidnc.

    Questions? Email NCHealthIT@dhhs.nc.gov.

    Since the pandemic began, Central Piedmont has implemented its own set of “slowing the spread” initiatives to ensure a safe learning and working environment for all. These are outlined on the Return to Campus website and include:

    • creating wellness stations, equipped with optional infrared temperature checks, face coverings, hand sanitizer, and latex gloves
    • making face coverings mandatory by all individuals on campus
    • developing posters, fliers, floor stickers, seating charts, and more to remind individuals of the three Ws (wear face coverings, wash hands, and wait six-feet apart)
    • requiring individuals scheduled to be on-campus to complete the online attestation form weekly
    • and transitioning the majority of instruction online to create flexible class formats, and limiting on-campus meetings for students, faculty, and staff.

    Thank you for following our safety protocols and doing all you can to keep yourself and each other safe.

    Visit coronavirus information for all of Central Piedmont's updates on the pandemic.

  • Small Business Center to Provide Free Government Contracting Webinar Series

    To help small businesses navigate any startup and/or growth challenges they are experiencing during the current COVID-19 pandemic, the Small Business Center is offering a series of free government contracting webinars in September and October.

    The series will focus on the following topics:

    Be sure to register early; slots fill quickly.

    Questions? Email renee.hode@cpcc.edu.

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus: State Moves to Reopening Phase 2.5 Sept. 4

    North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper announced Tuesday, Sept. 1 that he is moving the state into Phase 2.5 of reopening. Businesses like gyms and museums in Mecklenburg County and across the state closed since March because of the COVID-19 pandemic can reopen — with limitations — beginning Friday, Sept. 4, at 5 p.m.

    In summary, the Governor’s order states:

    • Gyms and other indoor exercise facilities can open at 30 percent capacity.
    • The limits on mass gatherings will increase to 25 people indoors and 50 people outdoors.
    • Playgrounds can open. Museums and aquariums can open at 50 percent capacity.
    • Capacity limits at restaurants and personal care businesses like hair and nail salons will stay the same.
    • Some places will remain closed, including bars, nightclubs, movie theaters, indoor entertainment, and amusement parks. Large venues will still be subject to the mass gathering limits.
    • The statewide age requirement for face coverings includes children as young as five.

    Central Piedmont Updates

    Central Piedmont fall semester classes are being taught in multiple formats — online, hybrid, blended, and face-to-face. (Hybrid and blended courses include both online and some face-to-face instruction.) The full 12-week fall semester began Aug. 10. Short- and mini-sessions of fall classes begin Monday, Sept. 14, Wednesday, Oct. 14, and Wednesday, Nov. 11.

    For students who attend classes on campus, please read the student guide to returning to campus carefully. It will be important you follow all of the safety practices detailed in the guide. These include wearing a face covering, keeping a social distance from others, washing your hands frequently, self-monitoring for possible COVID-19 symptoms, and staying home if you feel ill at all.

    Employees are encouraged to read the employee guide for returning to campus to learn how to best keep their teammates and students as healthy and safe as possible going forward.

    Class registration for the fall term is ongoing through Tuesday, Nov. 10. Learn more about fall session start dates and how to register for classes.

  • College to use grant funds to organize food drives, help at-risk students

    Bridge Builders Charlotte, a joint effort between Belk Chapel at Queens University and Chicago-based Interfaith Youth Core, has awarded Central Piedmont a $25,000 grant to promote social justice and educational equity across the Charlotte region.

    Bridge Builders Charlotte aims to use campus-community partnerships to overcome social divides and make our community stronger – with a specific aim of strengthening the Charlotte community’s response to the COVID-19 crisis.

    The grant proposal was spearheaded by Chris Brawley, a religion professor in the Humanities Division at Central Piedmont. The funding will be used to hire three Central Piedmont student interns who will work in conjunction with Central Piedmont’s Student Life department and local nonprofit Loaves and Fishes, to sponsor two food drives during the fall semester that will address the food needs of various faith traditions.

    In addition to preparing specially made food boxes and participating in the food drives, interfaith cards will be included in the boxes, highlighting the common call of every religion to serve others. The food drives will be captured on film and distributed to the wider Charlotte community, showing how various faith traditions can work together (and learn from each other) during times of crisis.

    Central Piedmont’s project is being funded through the Gambrell Foundation. Collectively, the Gambrell-Foundation is not only helping fund Central Piedmont’s initiative, but also a variety of projects housed at more than 10 faith communities, five other area colleges and universities (Davidson College, Johnson C. Smith University, Queens University, UNC Charlotte and Wingate University), and six nonprofit organizations.

    “These projects will forge connections between Charlotte-area campuses, local nonprofit organizations and religiously diverse communities,” Brawley explains. “Central Piedmont is excited to be involved in this process, and an active participant in leveraging Charlotte’s potential to expand opportunity for those who are most vulnerable as result of the coronavirus crisis.”

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus: Gov. Cooper Extends Phase 2 Until at Least Sept. 11

    North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper announced earlier today (Aug. 5) that Phase Two of statewide coronavirus restrictions will remain in effect until at least Fri., Sept. 11, keeping them in place through the Labor Day weekend.

    This is the third time the Governor has decided to maintain restrictions that limit the size of gatherings indoors and outdoors in retail stores, restaurants, and other businesses. The restrictions also keep bars, gyms, entertainment venues, and some other establishments closed for the time being. The state has been in Phase Two of COVID-19 restrictions on business and leisure activities since May 22. Restaurant dining rooms are allowed to have 50-percent occupancy, as are personal care businesses such as barbershops, salons, and tattoo parlors.

    Central Piedmont Updates

    Central Piedmont announced July 7 that fall semester classes will begin on Mon., Aug. 10 and be taught in multiple formats — online, hybrid, blended, and face-to-face. (Hybrid and blended courses include both online and some face-to-face instruction.)

    For students who will attend classes on campus, please read the student guide to returning to campus carefully. It will be important you follow all of the safety practices detailed in the guide. These include wearing a face covering, keeping a social distance from others, washing your hands frequently, self-monitoring for possible COVID-19 symptoms, and staying home if you feel ill at all.

    Employees are encouraged to read the employee guide for returning to campus to learn how to best keep your teammates and students as healthy and safe as possible going forward.

    Class registration for the fall term continues through Sun., Aug. 9. Students who would like to make changes to your schedule, you may do so through MyCollege until classes start on Aug. 10. We look forward to seeing you next week.