News and Features

What's going on in the Central Piedmont community and what Central Piedmont is doing in the community.

  • Message to College on Coronavirus: Face masks no longer required on campus

    On Friday, May 14, North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper announced the following changes to his previously mandated statewide COVID-19 restrictions. This relaxation of safety measures went into effect immediately on May 14.

    • No statewide face mask requirement in most settings
    • No mandatory indoor or outdoor mass gathering limits
    • No mandatory indoor or outdoor capacity limits
    • No mandatory social distancing requirements

    The Governor’s new executive order is based on new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations.

    Effective immediately, Central Piedmont Community College will not impose any restrictions beyond those the Governor has specified. Face coverings and social distancing protocols, while still encouraged for unvaccinated people, are no longer required by the college.

    Nothing prevents employees and students from continuing to wear face coverings if they so choose. Please keep in mind individuals should not be asked to disclose their vaccination status or why they are wearing a face covering. This is private information and should be respected.

    During this transition time, please be understanding as our employees and students make their decisions concerning face masks on campus. Please continue to monitor yourself for any COVID-19-related symptoms, and stay home if you feel ill at all. Please report if you are exposed to, tested for, or diagnosed with COVID-19 by sending an email to wecare@cpcc.edu.

    The Governor and the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services strongly recommend unvaccinated persons eligible for vaccination in the state be vaccinated as soon as possible. All persons in North Carolina age 12 and older are eligible. Likewise, Central Piedmont encourages all members of the college community – students, faculty and staff – to be vaccinated as soon as possible.

    Learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine by accessing the following resources: StarMed HealthWalgreensCVSNovant Health, and Atrium Health.

  • Message to College on Coronavirus: Governor Cooper Announces Social Distancing and Mask-Wearing Requirements Lifted

    North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper announced today, May 14, that he was lifting immediately many of the state’s COVID-19 social-distancing and mask-wearing requirements. In most settings, indoors and outdoors, the state will no longer require people to wear a mask or be socially distant. 

    This means there are no pandemic capacity limits for indoor and outdoor spaces. The Governor said fully vaccinated persons no longer need to wear masks in most indoor settings. However, state health officials still recommend that unvaccinated people in North Carolina continue to wear masks.

    Masks still will be required in some public spaces such as public transportation, healthcare facilities, and correctional facilities. Masks also are still required in childcare settings such schools, daycare facilities, and summer camps because children younger than 12 still are not eligible for vaccination.

    Businesses, retail establishments, and other facilities in the state are still allowed to require social distancing and masks.

    Any changes to Central Piedmont’s current social-distancing and mask-wearing requirements will be announced in the coming days.

    The Governor and the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services strongly recommend that unvaccinated persons eligible for vaccination in the state be vaccinated as soon as possible. All persons in North Carolina age 12 and older can be vaccinated. 

    Learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine by accessing the following resources: StarMed Health, Walgreens, CVS, Novant Health, and Atrium Health.

     

  • Message to College on Coronavirus: Governor Cooper Eases Pandemic Restrictions

    North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper announced today he will ease several statewide COVID-19 pandemic restrictions, including increasing the size of gatherings and capacity limits in retail stores and restaurants. The Executive Order will take effect March 26 at 5 p.m. and is set to expire April 30 at 5 p.m.  

    “We can move forward with easing restrictions if we do it safely,” Cooper said.

    The changes include:

    • The gathering-size limit will increase to 50 people indoors and 100 people outdoors. (Previous limits have been 25 indoors and 50 people outdoors).
    • Retail stores, salons, museums, and aquariums will be allowed to open at 100-percent capacity (up from 50 percent).
    • Restaurants, breweries, and gyms can be open at 75-percent capacity indoors (up from 50 percent) and 100 percent outdoors.
    • Bars, conference centers, music venues, and sports arenas will be allowed to open at 50-percent capacity (up from 30 percent).
    • The statewide alcohol-sales curfew is being removed. (The curfew has been 11 p.m. since Feb. 26).

    The state’s mask/face covering mandate remains in effect. All businesses still must maintain social distancing measures, which could limit the capacity of some establishments.

    Central Piedmont encourages all employees and students to get the COVID-19 vaccine. It’s available to all employees now, as a member of Group 3 through AtriumNovantStarmed, and Walgreens

    A COVID-19 vaccination clinic for Central Piedmont employees will take place in the Worrell Building, on Central Campus, Tuesday, April 6, from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Time slots are available. Register for an appointment today.

    The vaccine adds one more layer of protection and can further help protect your family, co-workers, and our students. Let’s gain control of the spread and get back to the places and people we miss.

    Learn more about the benefits of the COVID-19 vaccination. Visit covid19.ncdhhs.gov or cdc.gov today.

    In the meantime, the college urges you to continue to do your part and practice the 3W’s (wearing masks, washing hands, and waiting — keeping a distance — at least 6-feet apart) until the vaccine becomes available to all. Learn more about the state’s vaccination distribution plan.

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus: Governor Cooper Eases Some COVID-19 Restrictions

    In a February 24, news conference, N.C. Governor Roy Cooper announced he will begin to ease some statewide COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. The current statewide curfew or state-at-home order was set to expire February 28.

    Restrictions being reduced include:

    • Alcohol sales cutoff at restaurants and bars will be extended from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. Bars will be able to open indoors at 30% capacity or 250 people, whichever is less. The order takes effect Friday at 5 p.m. and lasts until March 26.
    • Movie theaters are allowed to operate now at 30% capacity, with a cap of 250 people.
    • Outdoor amphitheaters and concert venues can reopen at 30% capacity.
    • The statewide curfew for all non-essential travel from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. also is expiring, so restaurants and bars will be able to extend their hours.
    • More spectators will be allowed at high school, college and professional sports events. The number allowed will depend on the venue size. Arenas with a capacity of as many as 5,000 people will be able to open with up to 15% capacity, as long as they follow safety protocols.

    For more information and resources on COVID-19, please visit the college's coronavirus information page.

  • Central Piedmont’s COVID-19 Response

    Central Piedmont adapted quickly to a radically different environment in March 2020, when the COVID-19 pandemic changed everything. Over the last year, the college has responded to the COVID-19 pandemic promptly by quickly developing new safety protocols and practices and addressing it students’ and employees’ needs in the following ways:

    • moving more than 1,500 class sections online. Staff also moved all necessary student services to online/virtual delivery.
    • providing more than 1,270 laptops and 1,120 Wi-Fi hotspots as free loaners to students and employees. (As long as students are enrolled, they can keep and use the devices free-of-charge.)
    • raising more than $120,000 specifically for the Student and Employee Emergency Funds.
    • developing safety protocols and contact tracing procedures. (Even though some students and employees have contracted COVID, the college knows of no cases in which a person caught the virus from someone else on campus.)
    • welcoming students back in programs that require in-person instruction. Some students returned to campus as early as May 2020
    • hosting a drive-through graduation ceremony for 2020 graduates at Cato Campus in July.
    • establishing Central Piedmont Cares. To date, the Central Piedmont Cares and Single Stop teams have assisted more than 70 employees and 3,800 students. Categories of assistance provided include financial needs, food pantry, medical concerns, mental/emotional wellness, technology, and legal services.
    • expanding on-campus instruction for the summer 2021 semesters.

    Given the ongoing rollout of the COVID-19 vaccines, Central Piedmont hopes to return to normal on-campus operations in time for the fall 2021 semester. Regardless of when things get back to “normal,” the college will continue its work around student success and community service, both of which are guided by its vision, mission, and values.

    To learn more Central Piedmont’s other COVID-related news, visit cpcc.edu/news and select “COVID-19/coronavirus updates” from the left navigation.

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus: Spring Semester 2021 Hybrid Classes Can Begin Meeting On-Campus Feb. 3

    Spring semester 2021 hybrid classes can begin meeting on-campus Wednesday, Feb. 3. Students taking hybrid classes will check with their instructors over the next couple of days to confirm when their classes will meet on campus.

    Students in classes that have been meeting on campus will continue coming to campus as specified by their instructors.

    Students with questions about class meeting schedules have been asked to contact their instructors.

    If you will be coming to campus for the first time this semester, remember to read the Employee Guide for Returning to Campus. Also, remember to complete the Health Acknowledgement form the Monday of each week you will be on campus.

    Central Piedmont thanks its employees for working so hard this semester. Keep up the good work, and please stay safe.

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus: Gov. Cooper extends statewide curfew to Feb. 28

    N.C. Governor Roy Cooper announced today an extension of the statewide curfew that first went into effect for North Carolinians and businesses on Dec. 11. The extension announced today will remain in effect until at least 5 p.m., on Feb. 28, 2021.

    The extended “modified stay-at-home order” requires people to stay home between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m., and most retail and entertainment businesses to close by 10 p.m. All on-site alcohol sales are required to end by 9 p.m.

    Travel to and from work, to obtain food, medical care, fuel or social services, or to take care of a family member is exempted from the curfew.

    The N.C. Department of Health and Human Resources reports that while the post-holiday spike in COVID-19 cases across the state seems to have peaked, the state is still in a dangerous position. Hospitals across North Carolina remain at near capacity, and a new more-contagious variant of the virus has been identified in the state.

    The college encourages all community members to stay vigilant in maintaining all of our safety practices. Please keep wearing a facemask, practicing social distancing, washing your hands frequently, and monitoring yourself for any possible COVID-19 symptoms. Avoid large indoor gatherings and public spaces where people are not wearing masks. Should you develop any symptoms or feel ill at all, please stay home and consult a physician.

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus: Some Career and Technical Classes Will Meet On-Campus Starting Jan. 14

    In light of COVID-19 health directive clarifications provided earlier today by the Mecklenburg County Public Health Department and stringently following our pandemic safety protocols, Central Piedmont will move some career and technical education classes back to on-campus, in-person delivery.

    Starting Thurs., Jan. 14, classes in the following program areas will resume on-campus, in-person classes:

    • Basic Law Enforcement
    • Cardiovascular Technology
    • Cytotechnology
    • Emergency Medical Science
    • Human Services Technology
    • Medical Assisting
    • Medical Laboratory Technology
    • Notary Public
    • Nurse Aide
    • Nursing
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Ophthalmic Medical Personnel
    • Paralegal Technology
    • Paramedic Training
    • Pharmacy Technology
    • Physical Therapy Assistant
    • Polysomnography
    • Respiratory Therapy
    • Surgical Technology

    Class sections that began the semester as online or hybrid will continue online until Feb. 2, at which time the college will provide further guidance.

    Students with questions about the mode of your classes – online or on-campus – contact your instructors directly and check Blackboard. The college will continue to follow pandemic-related executive orders from N.C. Governor Roy Cooper and recommendations issued by the N.C. Dept. of Health and Human Services.

    The college encourages everyone to stay safe and vigilant in maintaining all of our safety practices, as COVID-19 cases are spiking in Mecklenburg County. Please keep wearing a facemask, practicing social distancing, washing your hands frequently, and monitoring yourself for any possible COVID-19 symptoms.

    For more information and resources on COVID-19, please visit the college's coronavirus page.

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus: Governor Cooper extends statewide curfew until January 29

    NC Governor Roy Cooper announced today an extension of the statewide curfew that went into effect for North Carolinians and businesses on December 11. The extension will remain in effect at least until 5 p.m. on January 29.

    The extended “modified stay at home order” requires people to stay home between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m., and most retail and entertainment businesses to close by 10 p.m. All on-site alcohol sales are required to end by 9 p.m.

    Travel to and from work, to obtain food, medical care, fuel or social services, or to take care of a family member is exempted from the curfew.

    “COVID-19 remains a deadly threat, and we’ve got to treat it that way,” Cooper said. “Simply put, don’t go places indoors where people aren’t wearing masks.”

    According to the Governor’s new executive order, “between December 5 and December 18, over ninety percent of North Carolina counties were experiencing ‘substantial (orange)’ or ‘critical (red)’ COVID-19 community spread, according to the County Alert System developed by the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, which evaluates a county's COVID-19 case counts, percent positives, and hospital capacity.”

    The college encourages all community members to stay vigilant in maintaining all of our safety practices. Please keep wearing a facemask, practicing social distancing, washing your hands frequently, and monitoring yourself for any possible COVID-19 symptoms. Should you develop any symptoms or feel ill at all, please stay home and consult a physician.

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus: Governor Cooper Issues COVID Update, Urges Vigilance Over Holidays

    N.C. Governor Roy Cooper and Secretary of North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services Dr. Mandy Cohen shared updates today on the COVID-19 County Alert System, warning that more than 90 percent of North Carolina counties are now designated as red or orange. All counties in the Charlotte region are designated in the red zone.

    Please see the official news release from the Governor’s Office.

    Central Piedmont reminds all students and employees to guard against COVID-19 spread during the holidays by always wearing a face mask and keeping a good social distance from others when in public, avoiding large indoor gatherings, and practicing other safety measures such as frequent hand washing and COVID-19 symptom monitoring.

    For more information and resources on COVID-19, please visit the college's coronavirus page.

    Please stay safe as we look forward to the start of the spring 2021 semester.