News and Features

What's going on in the Central Piedmont community and what Central Piedmont is doing in the community.

  • Introducing the Leon Levine Health Sciences Center

    In recognition of a $2.5-million grant from The Leon Levine Foundation to support health sciences education and health careers preparation at Central Piedmont Community College, the college is naming its new health programs facility on its Central Campus the Leon Levine Health Sciences Center.

    Located at the corner of Charlottetowne Avenue and Elizabeth Avenue, the Leon Levine Health Sciences Center opened in August 2020. While many Central Piedmont students still were taking classes remotely due to the COVID-19 pandemic, students in a number of health careers programs that require in-person instruction began taking classes and labs in the new facility immediately.

    Covering approximately 74,450 square-feet of space, the Leon Levine Health Sciences Center provides a home base for multiple health professions programs, including dental assisting, biomedical equipment technology, surgical technology, and polysomnography, and hosts a state-of-the-art virtual-anatomy classroom. In addition, the facility provides students with a number of hospital simulation rooms, including, trauma, mother and child, pediatric, typical patient rooms, an operating room, clinical laboratory, and pharmacy. The building is also home to the geomatics and civil engineering programs and provides several general use classrooms.

    “The Leon Levine Health Sciences Center has already made a significant and positive impact on the learning experience of our health professions students,” said Dr. Kandi Deitemeyer, Central Piedmont president. “The center is a state-of-the-art, cutting edge facility, in which the college can prepare its students well for the professional work environments they will enter and the equipment they will use.

    “We thank The Leon Levine Foundation for its generous grant, which will help Central Piedmont continue to provide a comprehensive offering of health careers programs that are among the best in North Carolina. Students in our nursing and allied health programs will continue to thrive at Central Piedmont and enter the workforce well-prepared to provide superb care.”

    The Leon Levine Foundation grant comes to the college as part of its ongoing “Powering a Stronger Future Campaign,” which seeks to raise $40 million to support students, programs and faculty development. Central Piedmont will use the grant to support programs aimed at providing health careers training and help ensure a broad range of students have access to these programs.

    “We are honored to be part of investing in Central Piedmont Community College’s ability to offer top-notch academic healthcare instruction and a career pathway for generations of students to come,” explained Tom Lawrence, president of The Leon Levine Foundation. “The new facility will also help promote access to quality medical care by creating a pipeline of professionals for the region’s healthcare sector and by providing valuable medical resources to both students and the community.”

    The Leon Levine Health Sciences Center at a glance:

    • Construction began – September 2017
    • Facility opened to students – August 2020
    • Square footage – 74,450
    • Source of funding – 2013 Mecklenburg County bond referendum
    • Architects – Creech & Associates working with Morris-Berg Architects
    • Project manager – Rodgers Builders

    About The Leon Levine Foundation
    Established in 1980 by Leon Levine (Founder and Chairman Emeritus of Family Dollar Stores, Inc.), The Leon Levine Foundation supports programs and organizations that improve the human condition through investments in education, healthcare, human services and Jewish values. Based in Charlotte, N.C., the Foundation invests in nonprofits across North Carolina and South Carolina with strong leadership, a track record of success, and a plan for financial sustainability. Through its investments, the Foundation intends to create pathways to self-sufficiency, champion strategies for permanent change, and facilitate opportunities for growth. Learn more online at https://www.leonlevinefoundation.org/  or follow on Twitter and Facebook @LeonLevineFdn.

  • College awarded $25,000 for new Metallica Scholars Initiative

    For the third-consecutive year, Central Piedmont Community College was selected to participate in the Metallica Scholars Initiative and receive $25,000 in funding to support its career and technical education programs.

    Funded by Metallica’s All Within My Hands (AWMH) and led by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), the Metallica Scholars Initiative was created in 2018 to fundamentally improve the earning potential for students who become Metallica Scholars.

    Central Piedmont will continue to use the grant funds to provide direct support for students enrolled in its healthcare career programs but who need financial assistance to complete their studies and become licensed healthcare professionals. These programs include: nursing, physical therapy assistant, and occupational therapy assistant. The goal of the initiative is to ensure students receive relevant jobs skills that will make them competitive in the healthcare field.

    “We are proud to work with Metallica to advance the career and technical education provided by the nation’s community colleges,” said Walter G. Bumphus, AACC’s president and CEO. “Colleges across the country provide pathways to well-paying jobs through programs, services, and training that lead to in-demand skills, certificates and degrees for students. These programs are responsive to the needs of local businesses and provide a pipeline of qualified workers to local industry. It’s a win-win for our students and the local economy. For Metallica to continue to invest in these students and communities is a testament to the power of the workforce education community colleges provide and we are proud to do this work with them.”

    Learn more about the Metallica Scholars Initiative at Central Piedmont.

  • Linda Lockman-Brooks elected to chair Central Piedmont Board of Trustees

    Linda Lockman-Brooks has been elected to chair the Central Piedmont Community College Board of Trustees by her fellow board members. Lockman-Brooks, a college trustee since 2016, is the first female and the first Black person to chair the board in Central Piedmont’s 58-year history.

    Lockman-Brooks is a Charlotte business executive with extensive leadership experience at large public companies, as well as expertise as a small business owner and entrepreneur. She is founder and president of Lockman-Brooks Marketing Services, which provides strategic marketing and communications services and executive talent development resources to a diverse book of clients, including AT&T, Bank of America, Novant Health, The Dallas Mavericks, Luquire Agency, and The Nature Conservancy.

    Appointed and reappointed a Central Piedmont trustee by the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Board of Education, Lockman-Brooks served on the board’s Finance and Facilities Committee from 2016-2018, and Executive Committee since 2018. She has chaired the Student Success and Strategic Initiatives Committee since 2018. She also is a co-chair of the Central Piedmont Foundation’s ongoing “Powering a Stronger Future Campaign,” the most ambitious fundraising effort in the foundation’s history. The campaign, with a $40-million goal and extraordinary success with a year to go, is aimed at supporting students, programs and faculty development and providing even greater access to underrepresented persons.

    “Central Piedmont has been fortunate to have Linda Lockman-Brooks as a highly engaged and thoughtful Trustee since 2016. Now, we are even more fortunate to have her chair the board,” said Dr. Kandi Deitemeyer, college president. “Linda assumes leadership of the board at a crucial time, as Mecklenburg County emerges from the COVID-19 pandemic, and the college readies itself to help a growing number of Mecklenburg County residents restart their careers or begin their higher education journey to greater economic mobility.

    “The college will look to its trustees for sound counsel and guidance as it works to extend education and job-training opportunities to all who seek them,” Deitemeyer added.

    Lockman-Brooks is past chair and serves on the board of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Library Foundation and on the board of visitors for Johnson C. Smith University. A sustaining member of the Junior League of Charlotte, she has also chaired the boards of the Arts and Science Council, Children’s Theatre of Charlotte and the YWCA of the Central Carolinas. She is a Senior Fellow of the Charlotte Chapter of the American Leadership Forum and was the Executive in Residence in 2020 for the Wake Forest University MBA program in Charlotte.

    Lockman-Brooks succeeds Edwin Dalrymple, who has chaired the Central Piedmont board since 2014. Dalrymple will remain a college trustee through June 2023.

  • Alumnus competing in Tokyo Olympics

    Central Piedmont alumnus Zach Lokken ’21 will represent Team USA in the Tokyo Olympics, July 23 – August 8. The Associate in Arts graduate will compete in the MC-1 Canoe Slalom event during his first Olympics appearance.

    Born in Durango, Colo., Zach has won several awards in the sport of American Canoe, including third place in C1 and C2 during the 2015 U.S. National Team Trials.

    When he’s not hitting the rapids, he enjoys skiing and longboarding.

    Learn more about Zach.

    WCNC-TV News Story: View the complete list of local athletes competing in the Tokyo Olympic games.

    Photo credit: AP

  • Janet LaBar, Caldwell Rose, and Michael Hawley to serve

    Janet LaBar, president and CEO of the Charlotte Regional Business Alliance, has been appointed to the Central Piedmont Community College Board of Trustees by N.C. Governor Roy Cooper. LaBar’s four-year term begins July 1.

    Charlotte attorney Michael Hawley has been reappointed to the Central Piedmont board by Gov. Cooper for another four-year term. Hawley has been a college trustee since 2017.

    Caldwell Rose, president of NAI Southern Real Estate in Charlotte, has been appointed to the Central Piedmont board by the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education to a four-year term beginning July 1. This is a continuation of Rose’s service as a trustee. He has been a board member since 2015, when he was appointed first by Gov. Pat McCroy.

    “The college is excited to welcome Janet LaBar to the Board of Trustees. Janet’s background and experience in workforce development and economic development makes her a great addition to the board,” said Dr. Kandi Deitemeyer, Central Piedmont president. “At the same time, we are grateful Mike Hawley and Caldwell Rose will continue as trustees. They have been highly engaged and have provided insightful counsel and leadership. We will rely on our 2021-22 board members heavily as the college welcomes more students back to campus and helps Mecklenburg residents find a post-pandemic path to career growth and greater economic mobility.”

    LaBar has led the Charlotte Regional Business Alliance since 2019. Prior to coming to Charlotte, she served as president and CEO of Greater Portland Inc., a regional economic development organization. Her other career positions include chief performance officer of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council, and research and communications manager for the Center for Workforce Development, a part of the Maricopa County Community Colleges District in the Phoenix metropolitan area.

    Hawley has practiced tax and business law in Charlotte since 1983, with the global firm K&L Gates and its predecessor Kennedy Covington Lobell & Hickman. He also worked as a visiting professor of law for the University of Florida College of Law, and as a vice president with First National Bank of Tampa.

    Rose is a native of Charlotte, and joined NAI Southern Real Estate in 1988. He has served in a leadership role on the Central Piedmont Board of Trustees, chairing the Finance, Facilities and Audit committee since 2018. He holds real estate brokerage licenses in North and South Carolina.

  • CoARC Recognizes College's Respiratory Therapy Program

    The Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC) has recognized Central Piedmont with its Distinguished RRT Credentialing Success Award. The award is presented as part of the CoARC's continued efforts to value the Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) credential as a standard of professional achievement.

    To qualify for the award, Central Piedmont's respiratory therapy program had to meet the following criteria:

    • have three or more years of outcome data
    • hold accreditation without a progress report
    • document RRT credentialing success of 90% or above
    • meet or exceed CoARC thresholds for TMB high cut score and retention

    Congratulations to the program's faculty, students, and alumni on this accomplishment!

  • Central Piedmont selected for ncIMPACT Initiative

    The UNC School of Government’s ncIMPACT Initiative announced recently the selection of 15 community collaboratives to an inaugural cohort working to better align their education systems with the needs of their regional economy. This intensive two-year project will position the cohort to significantly increase the number of individuals with postsecondary degrees, credentials, or certificates of value in the workforce. It aligns with the state’s legislative goal of 2 million individuals between the ages of 25-44 who possess a high-quality credential or postsecondary degree by 2030.

    Funding was provided by the John M. Belk Endowment and Dogwood Health Trust, a private foundation based in Asheville, N.C., with the sole purpose of dramatically improving the health and well-being of all people and communities of 18 counties and the Qualla Boundary in Western North Carolina.

    Central Piedmont Community College, the multi-campus college serving Mecklenburg County, is among the 15 chosen collaboratives. Aligning with their efforts to facilitate student learning, success, and completion, Central Piedmont is working closely with Mecklenburg County, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, and Bank of America.

    “These collaboratives offer an organized way to respond to future work challenges that no single institution or even an entire sector can effectively tackle,” said Anita Brown-Graham, professor and director of the ncIMPACT Initiative. “We are eager to begin this important work together.”

    Each team, or “collaborative,” may cover an individual county, a municipal-county partnership, or a multi-county region. The 15 selected collaboratives are led by the organizations identified below and serve the counties listed:

    • Cape Fear Workforce Development Board (Brunswick, Columbus, Pender, New Hanover);
    • Central Carolina Community College (Chatham, Harnett, Lee);
    • Central Piedmont Community College (Mecklenburg);
    • Eastern Carolina Workforce Development Board (Carteret, Craven, Duplin, Greene, Jones, Lenoir, Onslow, Pamlico, Wayne);
    • Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro (Guilford);
    • HIGHTS, INC (Jackson, Macon, Swain);
    • Land of Sky Regional Council (Buncombe, Henderson, Madison, Transylvania);
    • Made in Durham (Durham);
    • McDowell County Schools (McDowell);
    • Elizabeth City State University (Pasquotank);
    • Sampson Community College (Sampson);
    • Strategic Twin Counties Education Partnership (STEP) (Edgecombe, Nash);
    • Surry Community College (Surry, Yadkin);
    • Wingate University (Anson, Union); and
    • Work in Burke (Burke).

    Each participating community will benefit from: Five regional forums at which teams will establish goals, identify strategies, set plans for implementation, collaborate across sectors, and learn from experts; technical assistance support throughout the process; $15,000 to assist with the costs of hiring a community project manager; $10,000 in implementation funding for the project; evidence-based resources that respond to immediate learning loss concerns and prepare for longer-term planning; and a Local Attainment Collaborative Toolkit to implement and sustain demand-informed local collaboration with regional employers. The myFutureNC field-based regional impact managers will serve these collaboratives in partnership with ncIMPACT, as well as other communities across the state so they are positioned to join a future cohort of collaboratives.    

    "Building a strong talent pipeline will require a new level of cross-sector coordination. Among others, key strategic partners in these collaboratives must include PreK-12, universities, community colleges, workforce development boards, economic developers, chambers of commerce, county commissioners, policymakers, and civic leaders. And most critical to the overall success is ensuring decisions are being made based on data and research, and the voice of communities, businesses, industries, and employers is in the center of these important conversations,” said Cecilia Holden, president of myFutureNC.

    Forty-six project applications were received, representing 82 counties across the state. The selection committee sought to deliver a cohort with regional, economic, and demographic diversity; demonstrated community commitment; prior experience with educational attainment efforts; and identified barriers to educational attainment in the community. The ncIMPACT Initiative will manage this first cohort of collaboratives. myFutureNC will leverage the model developed through this cohort to identify and support additional collaboratives moving forward. Communities interested in updates and resources offered during this two-year project may visit: http://bit.ly/LEAC-project.

  • Central Piedmont to offer more four- and eight-week classes this fall

    This fall, Central Piedmont Community College plans to offer close to 40-percent more compressed classes – this includes four- and eight-week classes – than it did in fall 2020.

    The college’s decision to transition from the traditional, 16-week course schedule is based on national data from peer institutions, such as Odessa College, Ivy Tech Community College, Trident Tech and others, that shows students in compressed courses:

    • consistently achieve higher success rates than their peers who were enrolled in full-length courses. This is especially true among part-time students;
    • benefit from the constant pacing from term to term;
    • excel at a higher level because they have to focus on fewer classes at a time; and
    • have the opportunity to earn stackable credentials.

    As a result of these findings, Central Piedmont created a pilot program in spring 2021 through a number of its programs, including Business Administration, Criminal Justice Technology, Interior Design, Welding Technology, and others, that offered students the option of enrolling in traditional, 16-week class sections, or taking multiple eight-week classes throughout the spring semester.

    “We found students in compressed courses demonstrated improved time-management skills, enhanced focus and motivation, and improved knowledge retention,” said Dr. Heather Hill, vice president of academic affairs at Central Piedmont. “By offering our students more compressed sections, we are not only giving our students the opportunity to build a learning schedule that better accommodates their lifestyle, but also helping them complete and achieve their educational goals faster and on time.”

    Central Piedmont plans to offer more than 1,000 classes in a compressed format in fall 2021. The fall semester, as well as the first four-, eight-, and 12-week sessions, begin Aug. 16. If you’re interested in learning more about Central Piedmont or registering for fall semester classes, please visit www.cpcc.edu/admissions/registration.

  • Digital student success tool rollout underway at Central Piedmont

    Central Piedmont is partnering with Aviso to provide students, faculty, and staff with a new digital tool to maximize student success and increase retention. It will be our centralized hub to keep students better connected with their success team (navigator and/or academic advisor) and other college resources.

    Aviso allows all departments in the college to have a customized, holistic view of our students to better identify their individual needs and provide a streamlined -- and proactive -- way to help them at every step of their college journey. 

    Aviso also provides an early alerting system and robust data reporting tools to help us identify students who might be at risk -- early enough for us to most effectively intervene -- allowing us to impact students in a positive way to help them reach their individual goals. 

    For students, Aviso will give them personalized access to college resources and easy ways to contact their navigator and/or academic advisor. They’ll get alerts about grades and class progress, and about tasks that need to be completed along their journey at the college. We’ll send reminders about important dates and deadlines through the channels they use most -- text and email -- to make it simple to stay on track and stay connected with their success team. 

    “With the implementation of Aviso Retention, Central Piedmont will have the technology-enabled tools required to make a beneficial and crucial difference in the lives of our students,” said Dr. Chris Cathcart, vice president of student affairs. “Student success is not an independent task but instead a communal effort to identify and implement a strategy that best promotes success among our students. Aviso Retention is a helping hand for institutions ready to make that change.”

    Aviso rollout and training is underway for employees, and the tool will launch to students during the upcoming fall 2021 semester.

  • N.C. Longleaf Commitment Grant provides financial help for college students

    Governor Roy Cooper announced this week the launch of the North Carolina Longleaf Commitment Grant, a program for eligible 2021 North Carolina high school graduates who plan to attend one of North Carolina’s “Great 58” community colleges starting in the fall 2021 semester. 

    Thanks to the new program, high school graduates may be eligible to receive grant funds – not a loan – to cover tuition and fees toward a degree or to attain transfer credit.

    Full-time eligible students are guaranteed to receive $700 to $2,800 per academic year, for a total of two years. Part-time students may receive a partial award. The Longleaf Commitment Grant ends at the conclusion of the 2023 spring semester.

    In addition, the Longleaf Commitment program will provide matching grants to affiliated colleges to help the institutions expand their student advising, success coaching, and related services to support student success after students have enrolled.

    “This is tremendous news for prospective students,” said Dr. Kandi Deitemeyer, president at Central Piedmont. “The funds provided by the Longleaf Commitment Grant will help our incoming students persist and complete, achieve their academic goals, secure a better paying job, begin a family-sustaining career, or pursue further education.”

    Learn more about the North Carolina Longleaf Commitment Grant, including its eligibility requirements, and get connected to helpful resources.

    To talk with a financial aid counselor at Central Piedmont, call 704.330.6942, or email financialaid@cpcc.edu.