News and Features

What's going on in the Central Piedmont community and what Central Piedmont is doing in the community.

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus: Gov. Cooper Extends Phase 2 Until at Least Sept. 11

    North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper announced earlier today (Aug. 5) that Phase Two of statewide coronavirus restrictions will remain in effect until at least Fri., Sept. 11, keeping them in place through the Labor Day weekend.

    This is the third time the Governor has decided to maintain restrictions that limit the size of gatherings indoors and outdoors in retail stores, restaurants, and other businesses. The restrictions also keep bars, gyms, entertainment venues, and some other establishments closed for the time being. The state has been in Phase Two of COVID-19 restrictions on business and leisure activities since May 22. Restaurant dining rooms are allowed to have 50-percent occupancy, as are personal care businesses such as barbershops, salons, and tattoo parlors.

    Central Piedmont Updates

    Central Piedmont announced July 7 that fall semester classes will begin on Mon., Aug. 10 and be taught in multiple formats — online, hybrid, blended, and face-to-face. (Hybrid and blended courses include both online and some face-to-face instruction.)

    For students who will attend classes on campus, please read the student guide to returning to campus carefully. It will be important you follow all of the safety practices detailed in the guide. These include wearing a face covering, keeping a social distance from others, washing your hands frequently, self-monitoring for possible COVID-19 symptoms, and staying home if you feel ill at all.

    Employees are encouraged to read the employee guide for returning to campus to learn how to best keep your teammates and students as healthy and safe as possible going forward.

    Class registration for the fall term continues through Sun., Aug. 9. Students who would like to make changes to your schedule, you may do so through MyCollege until classes start on Aug. 10. We look forward to seeing you next week.

  • Free Loaner Chromebooks and WiFi Hotspots Available for Students in Need

    Central Piedmont wants to do all it can to ensure it helps students achieve their academic goals. That's why the college is loaning Chromebooks and WiFi hotspots - at no cost - to students in need who are having trouble accessing technology.

    Students can apply to receive one of the devices by completing the "Student and Employee Application for Laptop & Hotspots" or reading more about this opportunity on Central Piedmont's Single Stop Web page. Eligible students must be enrolled in a degree or transfer program for the fall semester. Students will be able to use these devices as long as they are enrolled in fall classes. 

    Applications will be processed within 24 hours and devices will be mailed directly to students. Please note, Gambrell Scholars should not apply as there will be additional information regarding Chromebook distribution shared directly with scholars separately.  

    Students needing assistance with the application or those without connectivity should call the Single Stop office at 704.330.6435 or email singlestop@cpcc.edu.

  • Central Piedmont announces plan for fall semester

    Fall semester classes at Central Piedmont Community College will begin on Aug. 10, and be taught in multiple formats – online, hybrid, blended and face-to-face. (Hybrid and blended courses include both online and some face-to-face instruction.)

    For the safety and well-being of the campus community, the college will complete the vast majority of face-to-face instruction prior to the Thanksgiving holiday. After Thanksgiving, remaining class work will be finished online. Fall classes will end Dec. 11.

    “Over the past several weeks, Central Piedmont Community College has been preparing for a safe and successful fall 2020 term,” said Jeff Lowrance, vice president of communications, marketing & public relations at Central Piedmont. “Through numerous discussions and detailed planning across all units of the college, Central Piedmont seeks to provide a safe environment for its students to learn and faculty and staff members to work.

    The majority of Central Piedmont students will come to campus a minimal number of times during the semester, with the rest of their instruction occurring online. The college is updating class schedules and information, so current and prospective students should check the college website periodically for updates.

    “Central Piedmont is committed to delivering a high-quality educational experience regardless of the program or courses a student selects,” Lowrance said. “The college is working hard to protect the well-being of everyone in our campus community and help students stay on track in their degree, diploma or certificate programs.”

    For students who attend classes on campus, the college has adopted a number of safety protocols. Current and prospective students should read the college’s Student Guide to Returning to Campus carefully. It will be important to know and follow all of the safety practices detailed in the guide. These include wearing a face covering, keeping a social distance from others, washing hands frequently, monitoring possible COVID-19 symptoms and staying home if one feels ill at all.

    The college offers nearly 300 programs to get students real-world ready. Affordable and flexible Central Piedmont classes can help students earn the skills to fast track into a career pathway or lay the foundation for a four-year degree. Registration for the fall term is now open. The college looks forward to welcoming new and returning students on Aug. 10.

  • July 14, 2020 Message to the College on Coronavirus: Gov. Cooper Extends Phase 2, Announces K-12 Re-opening Plan

    Gov. Roy Cooper announced North Carolina will stay in Phase Two of re-opening for another three weeks. Phase Two will stay in effect at least until Friday, Aug. 7, Cooper said during his July 14 news conference.

    “Our virus trends are not spiking like some other states,” Cooper said. “We have hospital capacity, and our percent positive is still high, but it’s steady. However, our numbers are still troubling, and they could jump higher in the blink of an eye.”

    In late-June, Cooper extended Phase Two of the reopening plan to July 17. Cooper also announced K-12 public schools will re-open under a “moderate social distancing” plan that limits how many people can be on campus, with many students getting a mix of in-person and remote instruction. The re-opening plan requires daily temperature and health screening checks and face coverings to be worn by all school employees and students, including elementary students. Most public students are scheduled to return to school on Monday, Aug. 17. Cooper said school districts will be allowed to re-open with remote-only instruction if they feel it’s needed for the health and safety of students. He warned the state could switch to requiring all schools to use online-only instruction if COVID-19 cases spike.

    Central Piedmont announced July 7 that fall semester classes will begin on Aug. 10, and be taught in multiple formats — online, hybrid, blended, and face-to-face. (Hybrid and blended courses include both online and some face-to-face instruction.)

    • For the safety and well-being of our campus community, we will complete the vast majority of face-to-face instruction prior to the Thanksgiving holiday. After Thanksgiving, remaining class work will be finished online. Fall classes will end Friday, Dec. 11.
    • Our academic programs are currently updating the course schedule based on how courses will be taught. Some courses will remain in their currently listed format, and, in other cases, the format will change, with online instruction replacing some of the face-to-face meeting times.
    • The majority of students will come to campus a minimal number of times, with the rest of their instruction occurring online. Students should review their schedule in MyCollege periodically over the next few weeks to check for updates.

    The college remains committed to delivering a high-quality educational experience regardless of a student’s program or course selection. Central Piedmont is working hard to protect the well-being of everyone in our campus community. For students who will attend classes on campus, we have adopted the best available practices for educational institutions operating in the pandemic. If you are enrolled in hybrid, blended, or face-to-face courses, please read the Student Guide to Returning to Campus carefully. It will be important you follow all of the safety practices detailed in the guide. These include wearing a face covering, keeping a social distance from others, washing your hands frequently, self-monitoring for possible COVID-19 symptoms, and staying home if you feel ill at all.

    Employees are encouraged to read the Employee Guide for Returning to Campus to learn how to best keep their teammates and students as healthy and safe as possible going forward.

    Registration for the fall term is open. Students who would like to make changes to their schedule may do so through MyCollege through the rest of summer and until classes start on Monday, Aug. 10. We look forward to seeing you in August.

    Visit coronavirus information for all of Central Piedmont's updates on the pandemic.

  • June 24, 2020 Message to the College on Coronavirus — Gov. Cooper Announces Face Coverings Order, Extends Phase Two

    North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper announced the state will remain in Phase Two for another three weeks, while making face coverings mandatory in public. Phase Two will remain in effect until Friday, July 17.

    “We’re adding this new requirement because we don’t want to go backward,” Cooper said. “We want to stabilize our numbers so we can continue to safely ease restrictions, and most importantly, get our children back in school.”

    Exceptions to the statewide mask requirement apply to children under 11, those with certain medical conditions, and people exercising outdoors away from other people.

    Central Piedmont will announce its plans for the upcoming fall semester sometime after the July 4 holiday, but well before the start of the term. Students will have ample time to register for classes and make work and childcare arrangements before the semester opens on Aug. 10.

    Preliminary plans for the semester include offering classes that are completely online, class sections that are primarily online, classes that will combine online and in-person instruction, and a smaller percentage of traditional in-person classes.

    Registration for fall semester classes is open, and students are encouraged to register now for the best selection of options. There will be a short registration pause June 26–30 for the end-of-fiscal-year closeout. Fall registration will resume on Wednesday, July 1.

    As a reminder, the Student Guide to Returning to Campus and the Employee Guide to Returning to Campus are easy to find on the Return to Campus page. Students and employees should read through the guidebooks carefully to be aware of the safety protocols and practices the college has put in place to keep everyone safe. On the Return to Campus page, you can also find student and employee videos that provide information about our new safety guidelines.

    Please remember: everyone going to a Central Piedmont campus must wear a face covering. This is a good safety practice and follows the new state order and Mecklenburg County face mask rule. Everyone coming to campus also must submit a Health Acknowledgement form weekly. The form is a way for students, employees, and visitors to attest to their current good health and lack of any known recent contact with COVID-19, and a commitment to follow safety best practices while on campuses.

    Visit the Return to Campus page to access the student, employee, and visitor Health Acknowledgement Forms.

    Thank you for your partnership as we keep our focus on your safety and your success.

    Visit coronavirus information for all of Central Piedmont's updates on the pandemic.

  • PNC Foundation $25,000 grant supports college’s Single Stop program, Emergency Fund

    The PNC Foundation has awarded Central Piedmont Community College a $25,000 grant to support the college’s Single Stop program, an initiative that connects students to the support services they need to succeed in college and administers the college’s Emergency Fund.

    “Our entire community has been affected by COVID-19, and the pandemic has been particularly difficult for students who have lost employment and income ― and who depend on campus resources for access to learning and technology,” said Weston Andress, PNC regional president for Western Carolinas and a Central Piedmont Foundation board member. “During this challenging time, we want the Central Piedmont student community to know that we understand and are committed to helping address some of the hardships they are facing.”

    Since 2016, Central Piedmont’s Single Stop program has served as a free, on-campus resource, removing barriers for students with critical needs by connecting them with resources to help them flourish academically, obtain good jobs and achieve financial stability ― through one-on-one meetings with experts representing the financial, tax and legal fields.

    In addition to matching qualifying students with specific tools to help fuel upward mobility in their lives, Single Stop administers monies available through the college’s Emergency Fund, which provides one-time support of up to $500 for students who have emergency needs related to housing, utilities, medical expenses, food, technology and more.

    The PNC Foundation’s gift is timely. The college will use the grant to help purchase the following items, which have been identified as students’ most pressing needs during the coronavirus pandemic:

    • Grocery/food gift cards. These items will allow students to purchase food, medicine and other essential products.
       
    • Technology access (laptops and Wi-Fi hotspots). The college has witnessed a surge in students needing laptops and Wi-Fi hotspots since it moved much of its course instruction online.
       
    • Resources for budgeting during a crisis. Single Stop's financial counselors are implementing and delivering online and virtual sessions for individuals and groups who need crisis budgeting assistance. Each emergency grant recipient is contacted by a financial counselor with tips on dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic from a financial perspective.
       

    “As a result of the pandemic, the college has witnessed an increase in the number of students needing resources to sustain their everyday lives in addition to their studies,” said Dr. Kandi Deitemeyer, president of Central Piedmont. “Many agencies in the Charlotte area have had to close temporarily, limiting the resources students can turn to for emergency crisis assistance. The PNC Foundation’s gift will help us streamline the connectivity process, ensuring resources such as nutrition assistance, technology support and financial aid reach the students who need them most in a critical time of need.”

    Learn more about Central Piedmont’s Single Stop program. If interested in supporting the college’s Emergency Fund, visit https://secure.cpccfoundation.org/donation/.

  • May 20, 2020 Message to the College on Coronavirus: NC Moves into Phase Two of COVID-19 Reopening

    North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper on Wed., May 20, signed an executive order moving the state into “Phase Two” of its COVID-19 pandemic reopening plan. The state’s ongoing stay-at-home order will end on Friday, May 22, at 5 p.m.

    Phase two allows restaurants, which had been limited to take-out or delivery service, to open at 50% capacity for dine-in customers. Personal care services, like hair salons, can open at 50% capacity. Swimming pools can also open at 50% capacity. Summer camps, including overnight camps, also may reopen with restrictions. Childcare centers may reopen to all families.

    Bars, nightclubs, indoor fitness facilities, public playgrounds and indoor entertainment facilities like movie theaters and bowling alleys will remain closed. Mass gathering restrictions allow no more than 10 people indoors and no more than 25 outdoors.

    Professional and college athletes may resume training as long as they adhere to the mass gathering restrictions. Cooper said religious services are exempt from the order, which will run through June 26.

    Central Piedmont’s summer 2020 classes began May 20. The vast majority of these classes began online and some will be part online, part in-person. Most summer students should not come to campus over the next few weeks. All summer classes with scheduled meeting dates at a campus location will begin as fully online courses. Instructors will let their students know the exact dates for any on-campus activities later in the semester.

    Students with any questions about classes should contact their instructors.

    The vast majority of Central Piedmont employees will continue to work remotely. College leaders are working on plan for a phased-in return to campus work. The plan will be shared with all employees as soon as it’s completed.

    To see the college’s most recent communication about the return of some on-campus classes, visit May 8, 2020 message to the college on coronavirus: some on-campus classes resuming.

    Visit coronavirus information for all of Central Piedmont's updates on the pandemic.

  • $15,000 AT&T grant to support Central Piedmont’s Emergency Fund

    AT&T has awarded the Central Piedmont Community College Foundation a $15,000 grant in support of the college’s Emergency Fund to provide immediate, short-term, financial support to students and employees who have emergency financial needs related to housing, utilities, medical expenses, food, technology and more.

    “Thanks to AT&T’s gift, the college is better positioned to respond to the growing financial needs of its internal community during this unprecedented time in our history,” said Dr. Kandi Deitemeyer, president of Central Piedmont. “This gift will help us purchase the technology our students, faculty, and staff need to successfully learn and work remotely and provide them with the financial assistance they need for tuition, books, child care, transportation, medical care, and other needs.”

    Given the extraordinary disruptions created by the COVID-19 pandemic, the college has seen an increase in requests for assistance from students facing a variety of pressing challenges. The pandemic has significantly exacerbated these challenges. AT&T’s support expands the college’s ability to help students in need at this critical time.

    “Just as all our lives have been impacted by COVID-19, everyone can play a part in helping neighbors and communities through these days,” said Kathleen Evans, regional director of external affairs for AT&T. “We are pleased to be able to support Central Piedmont in making a difference for students and their families.”

    Individuals interested in making a gift to Central Piedmont’s Emergency Fund can visit cpccfoundation.org/donation.

  • May 8, 2020 Message to the College on Coronavirus: Some On-Campus Classes Resuming

    Central Piedmont has worked hard to keep employees and students updated and safe during the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. For the first time since early March, the college is bringing some students back to campus for in-person classes. As we resume selected in-person classes, keeping everyone as healthy and safe as possible remains our top priority.

    In this first phase of returning students to campus, some health careers and some commercial driver’s license (CDL) students will have the opportunity to resume and complete their spring semester classes that were suspended in March. Some of the health careers classes have resumed already, others will start back on May 11 and 18. The CDL classes could begin as soon as May 18. This will ensure these students stay on track leading up to the Fall 2020 semester.

    These classes will require just few buildings to be open — Belk/Health Careers on Central Campus, Levine I and III on Levine Campus, and the CDL program facility at Merancas Campus. Student Affairs also plans to have few staff members available in Central High and Levine I at limited times to serve current students. The college plans to bring some construction technologies students back to Harper Campus in June.

    Again, this is the first phase in bringing employees and students back to campus. The vast majority of employees and students will continue to work remotely for several more weeks. Supervisors will inform their team members of their phase-in date. As the college works to bring more employees and students back to campus throughout late-spring and summer, if you do not feel comfortable returning to campus at that time, please notify your supervisor and/or Human Resources. If you are in a high-risk category with an underlying health condition or have any other questions or concerns, please contact your supervisor and/or Human Resources. The goal is to provide as much flexibility and keep everyone as safe as possible.

    Coming back to campus will mean we all must focus on being safe by taking the necessary precautions. If you feel poorly at all or come in contact with someone believed to have COVID-19, please stay at home. Do not come to campus. If, within two weeks of your return to campus, you have had a cough, shortness of breath, or two of the following symptoms: fever, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, or new loss of smell or taste, you might have COVID-19, and you should consult a doctor immediately. Please notify Human Resources.

    Please keep these important safety precautions in mind as you return to campus in the coming weeks.

    • Employees and students will need to wear a face covering during this first phase, in places on campus where social distancing is hard to maintain. Such places include classrooms, labs, restrooms, hallways, stairways, elevators, Student Services areas, campus bookstores, and in-person meetings. If you don’t have a face covering, the college will provide one when you first return to campus. Face coverings must cover your nose and mouth completely and can include masks, homemade masks, and bandanas. The need for face coverings will be re-evaluated as we enter future phases of returning people to campus.
    • Students and employees will have to attest on an online form that they are healthy with no COVID-19 symptoms and have not traveled recently to pandemic hotspots outside Mecklenburg County.
    • To practice social distancing, departments will be asked to use staggered scheduling so all team members aren’t in the office the on same days.
    • The college asks that no more than two persons at a time use an elevator and that they stand as far apart as possible. Please use the stairs if you are able.
    • Please maintain at least six feet between yourself and others on stairways, in hallways, in parking decks and lots, and other campus spaces.
    • Access to some common areas such as lounge spaces, as well as vending machines, could be limited for a while.
    • Meetings should be by phone/Webex whenever possible.
    • In-person meetings should include no more than 10 people. Such meetings should be held in rooms large enough to allow at least six-feet of space between persons.
    • We encourage you to wipe down your keyboard and other high-touch surfaces in your workspace with disinfecting wipes or other cleaning products every morning when you first arrive.
    • You should continue washing your hands regularly and frequently with soap for at least 20 seconds, and avoid touching your face as best you can.

    The college will do its part by having classrooms and labs, restrooms, stairway handrails, elevators, door handles, other frequent touch points, and common areas deep cleaned every evening.

    We are excited to resume some on-campus, in-person classes. We want to do all we can to help students stay on track and complete their programs of study. By everyone working together — wearing face coverings, practicing social distancing, washing our hands, staying home if we feel ill, and keeping our campus spaces clean — we can make the resumption of on-campus classes a success while keeping everyone safe.

    Please keep in mind that this is an ever-evolving situation. These directives could change as new developments occur and as we move toward bringing more people back to campus at some point during the summer semester. Thank you for your continued hard work and dedication to support our students and our community.

    Visit coronavirus information for all of Central Piedmont's updates on the pandemic.

  • Small Business Center to launch 'Small Business Rebound Program’

    Central Piedmont Community College’s Small Business Center is excited to announce it has launched a new initiative — the Small Business Rebound Program — to connect small business owners impacted by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic with Master in Business Administration (MBA) students from top universities and colleges located across the United States. The program will be available May 11–July 3, 2020.

    The program will provide business owners with exclusive access to business advisors, studying for their MBAs at some of the country’s most elite universities, including Stanford University, Duke University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Advisors will conduct virtual counseling sessions with participants, helping small business owners identify and apply for loan opportunities, redesign their business models, evaluate their budget, and analyze their cash management process.

    “Growing up in Charlotte, I saw how small businesses defined the character of our community,” said Ladd Hamrick, a Stanford University MBA student. “Our team of MBAs hopes to help by offering what we’ve learned in the classroom, from financial planning and marketing to crisis leadership.”

    One of the many perks of the Small Business Rebound Program is some participants may be eligible for a professional service grant. The MBA business advisors will work with small business owners to help assess and/or gather the information needed to help them apply for the grant.

    If awarded funding, eligible small business owners would have the opportunity to receive four hours of counseling from a Small Business Center Network-affiliated certified public accountant (CPA), digital marketing strategists, human resource expert, or attorney (a $1,200 or $1,500 value), depending on their area of need. Potential services include establishing a financial chart of accounts, developing social media accounts/a Google Business page, creating HR policies, and more.

    “The goal of this program is to help provide small business owners with the sounding board they need to analyze the current state of their business,” said Renee Hode, executive director of Central Piedmont’s Small Business Center. “Advisors will provide guidance, helping each small business owner sustain their business practices during this challenging time in the marketplace.”

    To learn more, visit the Small Business Rebound Program.