Information for Service-Learning Faculty and Staff

Service-Learning is a teaching method that combines service to the community with academic instruction, and it focuses on critical thinking and reflection. Service-Learning enables the student to put theory into action. Students are given the opportunity to learn course content on a deeper level since they are utilizing course content in the community Service-Learning is continuing to grow at Central Piedmont and nationally as a widely accepted form of experiential learning. ervice-Learning meets two of the 4 core competencies: Critical Thinking and Personal Growth and Development. Studies show that students who participate in Service-Learning have a higher GPA (23%), are retained from semester to semester (15%), and earn more credentials than non-service-learning students (17%).The Service-Learning staff is always available to assist you in any way, so please do not hesitate to reach out to us!

How Utilizing Service Learning in Your Courses Can Help You as a Faculty Member

  • Faculty can incorporate service-learning into their PDP including community engagement
  • Faculty are given the opportunity to network with non-profit agencies in the community through Volunteer Fairs, Community Partner Breakfasts, and other Service-Learning sponsored events and activities
  • Faculty are offered opportunities to attend professional development opportunities through Service-Learning including the annual Pace conference at Elon University.
  • Faculty partnerships through service-learning are highlighted in Service-Learning newsletters and annual reports that are shared throughout all of Central Piedmont and the local Charlotte Community

How long it takes for you to incorporate service-learning into your courses depends on how you choose to incorporate service-learning, if you make it mandatory or optional, and what type of reflection you require for your students to earn their grade. Please consult with your Service-Learning Coordinator at your campus to learn more. Complete Service-Learning 101 in order to learn more about Service-Learning as an experiential learning tool, how the Service-Learning Center can support the development of your service-learning curriculum, and how service-learning contributes to student retention and completion. This is offered in an online format for one hour of PD credit. Sign up for Service-Learning 101 now!

The Service-Learning Center offers the following services to faculty interested in incorporating service-learning into their curriculum:

  • Schedule and structure student orientation sessions where students will receive materials and on-line resources that include the following: an overview of the process, placement site information, forms to be completed and student expectations.
  • Recommend organizations based upon course learning objectives. Staff will consult with faculty on site selection, student orientation, reflection activities, the development of individual service opportunities and assessment/evaluation of the program.
  • Ensure students complete the necessary paperwork to be enrolled in the Service-Learning program, help the student find the proper placement (within the course objectives) and contact the organization.
  • Manage and maintain a database of participating students and provide periodic reports including hours completed and current placement sites.
  • Develop and support co-curricular and extra-curricular service activities.
  • Maintain a collection of articles, books, resources, syllabi and pamphlets pertaining to service-learning and related topics. Items may be borrowed via campus mail or pick-up. Contact the Service-Learning Center at service.learning@cpcc.edu for availability.

Service Learning Faculty Awards

Do you know a Central Piedmont employee who best exemplifies excellence as an educator and who has rendered outstanding service to the community? If so, please nominate that person (Word Document) to receive the Larry M Harding Award. Nominations are accepted until the end of June.

Please submit all nomination forms to Dena Shonts at dena.shonts@cpcc.edu. If you have any questions please call x6558.

Service Learning Resources for Faculty and Staff

  • Four Types of Service Learning You Can Use in Your Classes

    There are four types of service-learning that can be utilized in your classes. It is also common for Central Piedmont service-learning faculty to use a combination of two types of service-learning described below to meet the needs of their class:

    • Direct: Students complete service outside of the classroom at an agency approved by the instructor. Example: Students in a Sustainability class partnered with Habitat for Humanity to perform blower door tests for residents in low income homes.
    • Indirect: Students complete service during designated class time or on their own time for an agency that is approved by the instructor. Example: Students in a Graphic Design class developed a logo for The Crop Walk and Second Harvest.
    • Research Based: Students complete service during designated class time or on their own time for an agency that is approved by the instructor. Example: Students in a Statistics class analyzed data for the Habitat for Humanity Critical Home Repair program.
    • eService-Learning: Teaching method that combines ONLINE (partial to full) service to community & ONLINE (partial to full) academic instruction with focus on critical and reflective thinking. Example: Performing Arts and eTraining videos were created for a community partner’s volunteer coordination and training program.

    Elements that are essential to all Service-Learning projects:

    • The project(s) address a learning objective for the course.
    • Students are required to complete a reflection component that utilizes critical thinking skills.
    • The Service-Learning assignment is part of the course work and not an add on or extra credit.
    • Students are graded on the learning and not the service.
  • Resource Materials

  • Example Service Learning Syllabi from Service Learning Instructors

    For example service-learning syllabi from past service-learning instructors, please contact Service Learning.

  • Publications in the Service Learning Library

    The following printed materials can be checked out in the Service-Learning Center, room 257 in Overcash on the Central Campus. These are great resources for faculty who are interested in incorporating Service-Learning into their courses!

    • Adler-Kassner, Linda, Robert Crooks and Ann Walters, eds. Writing the Community: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Composition. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education, 1997.
    • Bailliet, Barbara J. and Kerrissa Heffernan, eds. The Practice of Change: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Women's Studies. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education, 2000.
    • Battistoni, Richard M. Civic Engagement Across the Curriculum. Providence, RI: Campus compact 2002
    • Bowen, Glenn A.  Reflection Methods and Activities for Service Learning: A Student Manual and Workbook. Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co., 2007.
    • Bringle, Robert G. and Donna K. Duffy, eds. With Service in Mind: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Psychology. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education, 1998.
    • Brubaker, David C. and Joel H. Ostroff, eds. Life, Learning, and Community: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Biology. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education, 2000.
    • Campus Compact. Assessing Service-Learning and Civic Engagement: Principles and Techniques. Rhode Island: Campus Compact, 2001
    • Campus Compact. Building Sustainable Programs: A Guide to Developing and Maintaining Service-Learning at Community Colleges. Arizona: Campus Compact, no date available.
    • Campus Compact. Introduction to Service-Learning Toolkit: Readings and Resources for Faculty - First Edition. Rhode Island: Campus Compact, 2000.  
    • Campus Compact. Introduction to Service-Learning Toolkit: Readings and Resources for Faculty - Second Edition. Rhode Island: Campus Compact, 2003.   (6) copies
    • Campus Compact. The Community's College: Indicators of Engagement at Two-Year Institutions. Rhode Island: Campus Compact, 2004.
    • Clayton, Patti and Myra Day. NC State Service-Learning Program: Reflection Session Guidebook, Reflection Leader Edition. North Carolina: NC State University Press, 2004
    • Colbert, Jan and Ann McMillan Harms, eds. Dear Dr. King: Letters from Today's Children to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. New York, Hyperion Books for Children, 1998.
    • Colby, Anne, Thomas Ehrlich, Elizabeth Beaumont, Jason Stephens. Educating Citizens: Preparing America's Undergraduates for Lives of Moral and Civic Responsibility. California: Josey Bass, 2003.
    • Devine,  Richard, Joseph A Favazza and F. Michael McLain, eds. From Cloister to Commons: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Religious Studies. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education, 2002.
    • Droge, David, ed.  Disciplinary Pathways to Service-Learning. Washington: Campus Compact National Center for Community Colleges, 1996
    • Droge, David and Bren Ortega Murphy, eds. Voices of Strong Democracy: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Communication Studies. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education, 1999.
    • Erickson, Joseph A. and Jeffrey B. Anderson, eds. Learning With the Community: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Teacher Education. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education, 1997.
    • Estrella Mountain Community College. "A Kaleidoscope of Best Practices in Service Learning." Arizona:  Estrella Mountain Community College, 2004.   (2) copies
    • Eyler, Janet and Dwight E. Giles, Jr. Where's the Learning in Service-Learning? California: Jossey-Bass, 1999.   (2) copies
    • Godfrey, Paul C. and Edward T. Grasso, eds. Working for the Common Good: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Management. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education, 2000.
    • Gottlieb, Karla and Gail Robinson. A Practical Guide for Integrating Civic Responsibility in the Curriculum. Washington, DC: Community College Press, 2002.   (3) copies
    • Greenleaf, Robert K. Servant Leadership: A Journey into the Nature of Legitimate Power & Greatness. New Jersey: Paulist Press , 1977.
    • Harkavy, Ira and Bill M. Donovan, eds. Connecting Past and Present: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in History. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education, 2000.
    • Harwood, Angela M. Conference Proceedings - Relationships, Responsibility, and Rigor: Service-Learning in the New Century. Washington: Washington Campus Compact, 2000.
    • Heffernan, Kerissa. Fundamentals of Service-Learning Course Construction. Providence, RI:  Campus Compact, 2001.
    • Hellebrandt, Josef and Lucia T. Varona, eds. Construyendo Puentes (Building Bridges): Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Spanish. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education, 1999.
    • Hoban, Mary T. et al. Campus HIV Prevention Strategies: Planning for Success. Washington, DC: Community College Press, American Association of Community Colleges, 2003.
    • Howard, Jeffrey, ed. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning: Strategic Directions for Service-Learning Research - Fall 2000, Special Issue. Michigan: OCSL Press, 2000.  (2) copies
    • Howard, Jeffrey, ed. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning - Fall 2003, Volume 10 Number 1. Michigan: OCSL Press, 2003.  
    • (2) copies
    • Howard, Jeffrey, ed. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning - Spring 2004, Volume 10 Number 2. Michigan: OCSL Press, 2004.  
    • (2) copies
    • Howard, Jeffrey, ed. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning - Fall 2004, Volume 11 Number 1. Michigan: OCSL Press, 2004.
    • Howard, Jeffrey, ed. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning - Fall 2005, Volume 12 Number 1. Michigan: OCSL Press, 2005.
    • Howard, Jeffrey, ed. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning - Spring 2006, Volume 12 Number 2. Michigan: OCSL Press, 2006.
    • Howard, Jeffrey, ed. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning: Service-Learning Course Design Workbook - Summer 2001, Companion Volume. Michigan: OCSL Press, 2001. (2) copies
    • Jacoby, Barbara, and Associates. Service-Learning in Higher Education. California: Jossey-Bass, 1996.    (2) copies
    • Kaye, Cathryn Berger. The Complete Guide to Service Learning: Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, & Social Action. Minnesota: Free Spirit Publishing Inc., 2004.
    • Kretzmann, John P. and John L. McKnight. Building Communities From the Inside Out: A Path Toward Finding and Mobilizing a Community's Assets. Illinois: ACTA Publications, 1993.
    • Lisman, C. David and Irene E. Harvey, eds. Beyond the Tower: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Philosophy. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education, 2000.
    • Mathews, David. For Communities to Work. Ohio: Kettering Foundation Press, 2002.
    • Milliron, Mark David and Cindy L. Miles, eds. Taking a Big Picture Look @ Technology, Learning & the Community College. Oracle, 2000.  (4) copies
    • North Carolina Campus Compact. Promising Practices of International Service & Service Learning. North Carolina: North Carolina Campus Compact, no date available.
    • Ostrow, James, Garry Hesser and Sandra Enos, eds. Cultivating the Sociological Imagination: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Sociology. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education, 1999.
    • Pew Partnership for Civic Change. New Directions in Civic Engagement: University Avenue Meets Main Street. Virginia: University of Richmond Press, 2004.
    • Pickeral, Terry and Karen Peters, eds. Campus Community Collaborations: Examples & Resources for Community Colleges. Arizona: Campus Compact National Center for Community Colleges, 1996.
    • Pickeral, Terry and Karen Peters, eds. From the Margin to the Mainstream: The Faculty Role in Advancing Service-Learning on Community Colleges. Arizona: Campus Compact National Center for Community Colleges, 1996.
    • Rama, D.V., ed. Learning by Doing: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Accounting. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education, 1998.
    • Rothman, Michael , ed. Establishing Universities as Citizens: Towards the Scholarship of Engagement. Indiana: Indiana Campus Compact, 1998. 
    • Schoenfeld, Robert. Service-Learning Guide & Journal: Higher Education Edition.  Washington: Guide & Journal Publication, 2004.
    • Seifer, Sarena D, Kris Hermanns and Judy Lewis, eds. Creating Community-Responsive Physicians: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Medical Education. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education, 2000.
    • Tidewater Community College. Civic Engagement Service-Learning: Urban Experience Service Learning Project. Virginia: Tidewater Community College Press, 2000.
    • Ward, Harold, ed. Acting Locally: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Environmental Studies. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education, 1999.
    • Watkins, Marie and Linda Braun. You Can Make a Difference: Service-Learning from Classroom to Community to Career. Canada: JIST Life, 2005.
    • Weigert, Kathleen Maas and Robin J. Crews, eds. Teaching for Justice: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Peace Studies. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education, 1999.
    • Wireman, Billy O. Lessons from the Big Guys. Alabama:New South Books, 2004.
    • Other Printed Materials
    • Campus Compact Annual Report for 2002 - "A Season of Service"
    • Games & Warm-up Exercises & Trust Exercises
    • North Carolina Commission on Volunteerism and Community Service 2005 Annual Report
    • North Carolina Community College System - Service Learning: The Active Way to Promote Student Success, February 27, 2003 - conference materials
    • Visuals
    • CPCC Students: "Putting Learning into Action" - Dan Herrin and CPCC student talk about this partnership between CPCC and Walter G. Byers Elementary, December 7, 2004. VHS. 
    • Center for Service Learning. VHS. 11 minutes.
    • Edens Lost & Found - Chicago: "City of the Big Shoulders." PBS Home Video. DVD 56:46.
    • Edens Lost & Found - Los Angeles: "Dream a Different City." PBS Home Video. DVD 56:46.
    • Edens Lost & Found - Philadelphia: "The Holy Experiment." PBS Home Video. DVD 56:46.
    • Edens Lost & Found - Seattle: The Future is Now." PBS Home Video. DVD 56:46.
    • Education for What?: Learning Social Responsibility. Campus Compact. "An ideal faculty development tool for campuses seeking to create or expand community-based teaching and learning programs." DVD. 60 minutes.
    • In Remembrance of Martin. PBS Home Video. Personal comments on the life of  Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. from family members, closest friends, former classmates and advisors. VHS. 60 minutes.
    • The American Experience: Citizen King. PBS Home Video.  Exploring the last few years of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s life. VHS. Approx. 120 minutes. 
    • The Visionaries: Earthjustice. VHS. 29 minutes.
    • The Visionaries: National Alliance for the Mentally Ill. VHS. 28:30 minutes.
  • Service Inventory Documentation

    The purpose of this inventory is to document notable ways in which Central Piedmont Community College is responding to the needs of our community, state, country, and world. Our objective is to record and update, on an annual basis, the service-related activities that are being implemented by our faculty, staff, and students under the auspices of Central Piedmont. 

    If your Central Piedmont club, department, or other affiliation has participated in a service project during the 18/19 academic year, please ask the project coordinator to complete the service documentation form and return it to the Service-Learning Center. Please return the form to Central Campus, Overcash room 241. You may also email the form to service.learning@cpcc.edu.

Contact a Service Learning Faculty Liaison

Central Piedmont has six service-learning faculty liaisons, and these liaisons help enhance campus-based utilization of service-learning pedagogy during their one-year terms. They are the vital link between current service-learning faculty members and the Service-Learning Center, and they also help recruit new service-learning faculty members. Service-learning faculty liaisons plan one service-learning event at their respective campuses each semester, so please check back here for future service-learning faculty events.