News and Features

What's going on in the Central Piedmont community and what Central Piedmont is doing in the community.

  • June 24, 2020 Message to the College on Coronavirus — Gov. Cooper Announces Face Coverings Order, Extends Phase Two

    North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper announced the state will remain in Phase Two for another three weeks, while making face coverings mandatory in public. Phase Two will remain in effect until Friday, July 17.

    “We’re adding this new requirement because we don’t want to go backward,” Cooper said. “We want to stabilize our numbers so we can continue to safely ease restrictions, and most importantly, get our children back in school.”

    Exceptions to the statewide mask requirement apply to children under 11, those with certain medical conditions, and people exercising outdoors away from other people.

    Central Piedmont will announce its plans for the upcoming fall semester sometime after the July 4 holiday, but well before the start of the term. Students will have ample time to register for classes and make work and childcare arrangements before the semester opens on Aug. 10.

    Preliminary plans for the semester include offering classes that are completely online, class sections that are primarily online, classes that will combine online and in-person instruction, and a smaller percentage of traditional in-person classes.

    Registration for fall semester classes is open, and students are encouraged to register now for the best selection of options. There will be a short registration pause June 26–30 for the end-of-fiscal-year closeout. Fall registration will resume on Wednesday, July 1.

    As a reminder, the Student Guide to Returning to Campus and the Employee Guide to Returning to Campus are easy to find on the Return to Campus page. Students and employees should read through the guidebooks carefully to be aware of the safety protocols and practices the college has put in place to keep everyone safe. On the Return to Campus page, you can also find student and employee videos that provide information about our new safety guidelines.

    Please remember: everyone going to a Central Piedmont campus must wear a face covering. This is a good safety practice and follows the new state order and Mecklenburg County face mask rule. Everyone coming to campus also must submit a Health Acknowledgement form weekly. The form is a way for students, employees, and visitors to attest to their current good health and lack of any known recent contact with COVID-19, and a commitment to follow safety best practices while on campuses.

    Visit the Return to Campus page to access the student, employee, and visitor Health Acknowledgement Forms.

    Thank you for your partnership as we keep our focus on your safety and your success.

    Visit coronavirus information for all of Central Piedmont's updates on the pandemic.

  • Announcing the Spring 2020 Central Piedmont Dean's and President's Lists

    Congratulations to our spring 2020 Central Piedmont Dean's and President's list students!

    These lists recognize students enrolled in for-college-credit programs who achieved a high grade point average (GPA) with no Incomplete ("I") or Withdraw ("W") grades and who have completed at least 12 hours of credit in courses numbered 100 through 299. Dean's List students earned a 3.50 or higher GPA; President's List students earned a 4.00 or higher GPA.

    These students have worked very hard over the semester and have well earned this accomplishment.

  • College to provide customized training for Chime Solutions

    Central Piedmont is partnering with Chime Solutions, an Atlanta-based customer-contact service provider, to offer customized training for the 250 new life/health insurance agent positions the company is bringing to the Queen City.

    As part of its expansion package, Chime Solutions was named a recipient of the North Carolina Community College System’s Customized Training Program.

    The community college system’s Customized Training Program provides education, training, and support services for new, expanding, and existing business and industry in North Carolina. To qualify, businesses must demonstrate an appreciable capital investment, the creation of new jobs, and/or the deployment of new technology.

    Central Piedmont will facilitate the work with Chime Solutions’ leadership team to not only design a customized life and health pre-licensing program, but also a Medicare supplement training program for the company.

    A handful of the college’s community partners will assist with several facets of the customized training program — Charlotte Works and the Urban League of Central Carolinas will support and advertise a virtual job fair for Chime Solutions, and Horizon Professional Education will facilitate the Medicare Supplement training sessions required of each candidate. All of the provided training will be available at no cost to new employees seeking a life/health insurance agent position with the company.

    To become qualified for Chime Solution’s new positions, candidates will receive computer training in Microsoft Excel and take a variety of interpersonal skills classes; while aspiring, new leaders will complete a host of supervisory skills training classes.

    “During a time period when unemployment is high in the Queen City, Chime Solutions recognized the talented workforce available in our area,” said Allison Bowers, director of economic recruitment and corporate learning at Central Piedmont. “We are delighted Charlotte was chosen as their final destination.”

    The college plans to provide the training in-person via multiple sessions over several weeks, so it’s able to adhere to the state’s social distancing guidelines during the current pandemic. Candidates will be required to complete 24 hours of life and health pre-licensing training, as well as additional hours of Medicare supplement training.

    Learn more about the college’s Corporate Learning Center.

  • Central Piedmont student writer’s work featured in Teen Vogue

    Central Piedmont student Michael-Michelle Pratt, a student in the college’s Associate in Arts degree program, recently had an op-ed piece featured in the June issue of Teen Vogue called, “Growing Up Black Between Trayvon Martin and George Floyd Has My Generation at a Boiling Point.”

    When Pratt began sharing her thoughts on systemic racism and the Black Lives Matter movement on Twitter earlier this year, she had no idea her comments would attract the attention of the political editor at Teen Vogue, who began following her online.

    In her online musings, Pratt discussed that while the recent death of George Floyd was causing a resurgence in the Black Lives Matter movement, no one was talking about how the tragedy had impacted her generation — Generation Z, a segment of the population that had largely grown up between the deaths of Trayvon Martin in 2012 and George Floyd in 2020. She pitched the article topic to the editor at Teen Vogue, and they accepted.

    “I wanted my article to explain to readers that the events of Trayvon Martin, George Floyd and others are not isolated incidents that happened in a bubble,” said Pratt. “I wanted to explain that everything that is happening today is a combination of past and present frustration — that it has all built up to this critical moment, a boiling point that we’re about to see spill over.”

    In the op-ed, Pratt discusses first learning about the Trayvon Martin shooting; the impact it had on her adolescence/family; how the incident inspired her to begin following strong female, African-American writers (Toni Morrison, Audre Lorde, Alice Walker); and how it propelled her to seek out leadership opportunities that would allow her to not only fight back against oppression, but to also find her voice.

    Thankfully, Pratt has discovered an outlet for her voice at Central Piedmont’s Levine Campus in Matthews, NC, where she participates in the campus’s Student Writers Assembles Guild (SWAG), a student creative writing club formed in 2016 that provides individuals with a creative space to write poetry, short stories, articles, screenplays and more.

    “Michael-Michelle is a talented writer and poet,” said Elizabeth West, an associate instructor and faculty advisor for Central Piedmont’s SWAG.“She has a strong voice and is brave enough to use it to enact change in our community. She has a sweet, quiet demeanor in person, but her words ring loud and strong on the page. She is a wonderful SWAG member and we are all so proud of her accomplishments.”

    Pratt plans to graduate from Central Piedmont in August 2021 and pursue a career in journalism or film to become a director/screenwriter. “While I love being able to discuss my opinions on the cultural climate in which we all live in articles, I love being able to create my own world in a screenplay,” said Pratt.

    Learn more about Central Piedmont’s Associate in Arts program. For information on the college’s Student Writers Assembles Guild (SWAG), please email elizabeth.west@cpcc.edu.

  • 'The Hammer' Student Art and Literature Magazine Spring 2020

    The spring 2020 issue of "The Hammer" magazine is now available.

  • A Message to the College Community

    A message to all Central Piedmont students and employees from Dr. Deitemeyer:

    Since early March, our college, city, state, and nation have been focused on the unanticipated effects of COVID-19. Our primary objective has been to keep our students, faculty, and staff safe and to determine the best path forward as we return to campus. That work continues, and we remain steadfast in ensuring our college and campuses can provide educational, social, and emotional support for our community. What our college means to so many is vital, and we must be more vibrant and ready to serve with new exceptional standards of excellence.

    These months have been unprecedented in so many ways. I never imagined as we wrapped up the academic year our college, community, state, and nation would be immersed in more devastating circumstances that give us great pause about the care, safety, treatment, and concern for our fellow man: George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor. In the last few weeks COVID-19 has been in the forefront of our minds, but in the last few days, we have been reminded that there is more than a healthcare pandemic impacting our nation, our state, our community.

    Central Piedmont is troubled and saddened by the events in Minneapolis and other cities around our nation, including here in Charlotte. The college acknowledges the pain, anger, fear, and other emotions felt deeply by those involved and even those watching from afar. The college knows these events affect many of our students and employees. It is our hope and prayer that everyone stays safe, that wise and peaceful actions win out over violence, and justice prevails for all involved.

    This college has always condemned racism and bigotry and the unfair treatment of minorities, and will continue to do so. You will recall Central Piedmont champions equity as an institutional value and an institutional goal, and we do not take that lightly. Our college is committed to breaking down barriers to student access and achievement and providing pathways to family-sustaining careers or to further education. We embrace diversity and respect all individuals and the journeys they make to reach our college. Our work on equity is so important, and the courage we are showing as an institution will be even more important as our community heals and moves forward.

    As leaders in our community, we must demonstrate our willingness to discuss our differences, share our perspectives, grieve together, and question how such events continue to occur. While we do, I ask that we continue to champion our mission and be a catalyst for opportunity in our community and move forward with intentionality to identify and address the inequities and systemic racism we see in our community. As an institution of higher learning, we must be a safe haven for our students, faculty, and staff. As one college, we need to acknowledge members of our college community are hurting, and they need us more than ever.

    If you are feeling concern, stress, or anxiety, the college reminds you counseling services are available to students and employees. Students simply need to complete the online Counseling Services form, and a college counselor will respond.

    Our Central Piedmont Cares team members are here to assist students and employees. Team members are ready to help at wecare@cpcc.edu, or see the Central Piedmont Cares website for more information.

  • PNC Foundation $25,000 grant supports college’s Single Stop program, Emergency Fund

    The PNC Foundation has awarded Central Piedmont Community College a $25,000 grant to support the college’s Single Stop program, an initiative that connects students to the support services they need to succeed in college and administers the college’s Emergency Fund.

    “Our entire community has been affected by COVID-19, and the pandemic has been particularly difficult for students who have lost employment and income ― and who depend on campus resources for access to learning and technology,” said Weston Andress, PNC regional president for Western Carolinas and a Central Piedmont Foundation board member. “During this challenging time, we want the Central Piedmont student community to know that we understand and are committed to helping address some of the hardships they are facing.”

    Since 2016, Central Piedmont’s Single Stop program has served as a free, on-campus resource, removing barriers for students with critical needs by connecting them with resources to help them flourish academically, obtain good jobs and achieve financial stability ― through one-on-one meetings with experts representing the financial, tax and legal fields.

    In addition to matching qualifying students with specific tools to help fuel upward mobility in their lives, Single Stop administers monies available through the college’s Emergency Fund, which provides one-time support of up to $500 for students who have emergency needs related to housing, utilities, medical expenses, food, technology and more.

    The PNC Foundation’s gift is timely. The college will use the grant to help purchase the following items, which have been identified as students’ most pressing needs during the coronavirus pandemic:

    • Grocery/food gift cards. These items will allow students to purchase food, medicine and other essential products.
       
    • Technology access (laptops and Wi-Fi hotspots). The college has witnessed a surge in students needing laptops and Wi-Fi hotspots since it moved much of its course instruction online.
       
    • Resources for budgeting during a crisis. Single Stop's financial counselors are implementing and delivering online and virtual sessions for individuals and groups who need crisis budgeting assistance. Each emergency grant recipient is contacted by a financial counselor with tips on dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic from a financial perspective.
       

    “As a result of the pandemic, the college has witnessed an increase in the number of students needing resources to sustain their everyday lives in addition to their studies,” said Dr. Kandi Deitemeyer, president of Central Piedmont. “Many agencies in the Charlotte area have had to close temporarily, limiting the resources students can turn to for emergency crisis assistance. The PNC Foundation’s gift will help us streamline the connectivity process, ensuring resources such as nutrition assistance, technology support and financial aid reach the students who need them most in a critical time of need.”

    Learn more about Central Piedmont’s Single Stop program. If interested in supporting the college’s Emergency Fund, visit https://secure.cpccfoundation.org/donation/.

  • Central Piedmont to offer expanded evening, Friday and Saturday courses at three campuses

    Beginning this fall, Central Piedmont Community College will offer expanded course offerings of some of its most in-demand classes on weekday evenings, Fridays, and Saturdays at its Central, Harris, and Levine campuses. The added course sections give students more options so they can complete a two-year, college transfer degree more quickly.

    Central Piedmont’s new course offerings are comprised of more than 70 class sections of 20 high-demand, general education college transfer courses. The classes will be offered in sequential order and focus on a variety of subjects, ranging from biology and public speaking, to psychology and business.

    “We’re excited about our new course offerings and how they will have a positive impact on our students’ lives,” said Edith McElroy, dean of Central Piedmont’s Levine Campus. “By offering more courses in the evenings, and on Fridays and Saturdays, we’re able to better accommodate our students’ busy schedules, setting them up for success both inside and outside of the classroom.”

    This is the first time the college’s Harris Campus has offered high-demand college transfer classes to residents, giving individuals more options to complete an associate degree. In the past, its course offerings were specific to an academic program, such as baking & pastry arts, dental assisting, early childhood education, and others.

    In addition to offering more high-demand classes at Harris Campus, Central Piedmont will boast Saturday-only courses for students interested in earning a general Associate in Arts degree or an Associate in Arts degree in business administration in two years. Students seeking either of these degrees will be placed on a learning track that will require them to complete two to three courses, every eight weeks.

    The additional courses and weekend accessibility will also give residents the opportunity to experience Central Piedmont — a college that believes in providing individuals with an affordable, hands-on education that will prepare them for the real world so they can make a difference in their community and beyond.

    To learn more about Central Piedmont’s expanded weekday evening, Friday, and Saturday classes, please visit our transfer degree page or contact Suzanne Marcoux at 704.330.4278 or suzanne.marcoux@cpcc.edu.

  • College launches 'community' ad campaign

    Central Piedmont understands there are so many traditional age students and adults in Mecklenburg County with questions about the future. “Will they be able to go back to or start college?” “Is it time to make a career change to something with greater consistency and stability?” 

    With this in mind, the college’s Communications, Marketing, & Public Relations team worked with the Charlotte marketing and advertising agency, Mythic, to produce 60-second, 30-second, and 15-second “community” commercial spots.

    The team asked faculty, staff, and students to submit content showing how they were coming together while apart during this unprecedented time.

    Communications, Marketing, & Public Relations received a number of responses and submissions, which were incorporated into the ads that will run across Charlotte, on network and cable tv, as well as on digital/streaming platforms, YouTube, Instagram, and Facebook.

    The ad's message is simple. It highlights Central Piedmont’s sense of community, and that when a student chooses to attend Central Piedmont, they immediately become a part of something bigger – an institution, a community, that will help them conquer possibility.

  • May 20, 2020 Message to the College on Coronavirus: NC Moves into Phase Two of COVID-19 Reopening

    North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper on Wed., May 20, signed an executive order moving the state into “Phase Two” of its COVID-19 pandemic reopening plan. The state’s ongoing stay-at-home order will end on Friday, May 22, at 5 p.m.

    Phase two allows restaurants, which had been limited to take-out or delivery service, to open at 50% capacity for dine-in customers. Personal care services, like hair salons, can open at 50% capacity. Swimming pools can also open at 50% capacity. Summer camps, including overnight camps, also may reopen with restrictions. Childcare centers may reopen to all families.

    Bars, nightclubs, indoor fitness facilities, public playgrounds and indoor entertainment facilities like movie theaters and bowling alleys will remain closed. Mass gathering restrictions allow no more than 10 people indoors and no more than 25 outdoors.

    Professional and college athletes may resume training as long as they adhere to the mass gathering restrictions. Cooper said religious services are exempt from the order, which will run through June 26.

    Central Piedmont’s summer 2020 classes began May 20. The vast majority of these classes began online and some will be part online, part in-person. Most summer students should not come to campus over the next few weeks. All summer classes with scheduled meeting dates at a campus location will begin as fully online courses. Instructors will let their students know the exact dates for any on-campus activities later in the semester.

    Students with any questions about classes should contact their instructors.

    The vast majority of Central Piedmont employees will continue to work remotely. College leaders are working on plan for a phased-in return to campus work. The plan will be shared with all employees as soon as it’s completed.

    To see the college’s most recent communication about the return of some on-campus classes, visit May 8, 2020 message to the college on coronavirus: some on-campus classes resuming.

    Visit coronavirus information for all of Central Piedmont's updates on the pandemic.