The Charlotte Region’s Global Economic Vision

“The combined effect of the forces within big cities, great universities (and colleges) and powerful local leaders will provide the next economic breakthrough.”
- Adapted from “The Coming Jobs War” by Jim Clifton

Download a copy of our brochure.

The economic vision for the Charlotte region’s future is to become “a global hub of commerce,” a great inland port city leveraging its financial, energy, health care, educational, entrepreneurial, manufacturing and logistical resources to world prominence. The result will be greater regional prosperity with more jobs.

Economic History

Charlotte owes its existence to its location at the intersection of two ancient, local trading paths. Through time, the intersection gained prominence in the region, then the nation and now the world. Charlotte is located at one of those pivotal global intersections. Here, you can create, import, manufacture, export and deliver just-in-time anything, anywhere. And you can do it more economically and with a better margin of profit than anywhere else. Charlotte offers fertile soil in which businesses can grow and prosper. Four booms and four busts (gold, military, textiles and banking) in Charlotte’s business history resulted in some hurdles along the way toward the vision. Each of these economic events made Charlotte stronger and provided a solid base for the future. Upon that basis we will build an economic engine providing growth across many sectors of the business economy.

Economic Pillars

The Charlotte region is fortunate with rich assets including water, energy, air quality, education, finance, health care, roads, the airport and a skilled labor force.

Our economic pillars today include being the #1 energy hub in the United States, the #2 financial center in the U.S., and #3 world-class health care facilities and services, and wonderful higher education resources. As we work to realize our global economic vision, we will add four new economic foundations of entrepreneurialism, advanced manufacturing, improved infrastructure, transportation and logistics, and improved higher education and workforce development.

The economic future of the Charlotte region is limited only by our collective imaginations and will to seize the opportunities to achieve our vision one person and one organization at a time. The next decade will be exciting, dynamic and prosperous!

Implementation Strategies

To achieve our global vision, regional, private and public leaders must collaborate and seize the opportunities to broaden our economic base and take our place on the international stage. To do this, we must:

  1. Learn to “create things” better than our competitors by adopting entrepreneurialism and innovation as prominent and core values of the region and provide support for innovation and new business creators.
  2. “Make things” better than our competitors by growing our advanced manufacturing base and providing these businesses with world-class employees through exemplary education and training success.
  3. “Move things” better than our competitors through the new intermodal center at the Charlotte-Douglas International Airport. We will move people and goods faster, cheaper and more efficiently through the consolidation of train, truck, air and ship transportation. In the process, we will become a natural leader in logistics and supply-chain management.

How You Can Be a Part of the Global Vision

  1. Consider how your organization or industry association can benefit from the global vision outlined in this brochure.
  2. Add a global vision to your organization’s strategic plan.
  3. Take advantage of the opportunities that will result from the intermodal hub at the Charlotte-Douglas International Airport.
  4. Get involved with a K-12 or college’s workforce development partnership with industry.

 

“Fixing America’s biggest problems and re-winning the world can only be accomplished one city (or region) at a time. Ultimately, all solutions are local.”
- Adapted from “The Coming Jobs War” by Jim Clifton

Get Involved

Mary Vickers-Koch
Dean, Harris Campus and Business and industry Learning