World War I and America

 

lincoln

World War I: The Centenary of the U.S. Entry into the War

Organized to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the nation’s entry into the war in 1917, the project will bring members of the veteran community together with the general public in libraries and museums around the country to explore the transformative impact of the First World War by reading, discussing, and sharing insights into the writings of Americans who experienced it firsthand. Providing scholar-moderated opportunities for those who served in more recent conflicts in Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan to bring their experiences to bear on historical events and texts, the project will illuminate for a wide audience the lasting legacies of World War I, and the similarities and differences between past and present.

The CPCC Library is sponsoring the following events for the public in connection with the exhibition.

For more information, call 704-330-6885.



Schedule of Events

Free, public parking is available in the Faculty/Staff Parking Deck, accessible from 4th Street.

View the Central Campus Map for parking information.

A printable poster of events can be found here.

Why Fight?

Date: July 19 2017
Time: 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Location: Tate Hall located in the Overcash Building (map)

This program will provide a historical background of WWI including the people in leadership and the role of Camp Greene, located in Mecklenburg County, as a training facility to prepare troops before going to Europe.

Dr. Hugh Dussek will present and facilitate discussion.

Hugh Dussek is originally from London, England.  He holds an undergraduate degree from The University of the State of New York; a master’s degree in the Humanities from California State University, Dominguez Hills; and a doctoral degree in History from Union Institute & University in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Hugh teaches courses on world civilizations, American history and local history at Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) in Charlotte, North Carolina. He has made presentations on the American colonies, the American Revolution and local history for CPCC’s “Trail of History” television series and for “American History TV” on C-Span 3.

CPCC employees may register for PD credit here.

Reading Circle: War as Described by Writers

The Experience of War & Women at War

Date: September 12, 2017
Time: 9:30am - 10:45am

Race and WWI & The Home Front: Selling Unity, Suppressing Dissent

Date: October 17, 2017
Time: 11:00am - 12:15pm
Location: Central Campus Library, 2nd Floor Atrium (map)

CPCC employees may register for PD credit here.

Library of America Project Reader

Library of America Project Videos

Attendees will participate in a guided discussion based on readings and themes shared by writers during war time.

Brian Anderson, English instructor at Central Piedmont Community College, will facilitate the discussions.

Brian Anderson received his BA in History and a MA in English from Appalachian State University.

World War I and America CPCC Library Exhibition

Dates: October 16, 2017 - November 30, 2017
Times: Open during regular library hours
Location:Central Campus Library, 2nd Floor Atrium (map)

This exhibit will feature war memorabilia from local libraries, museums, veterans and their families, drawing upon letters and images to tell the story of WWI.


The Toll of War and Homecoming: A Panel Discussion Featuring Veterans

Date: November 14, 2017
Time: 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: Central Campus Library, Pease Auditiorium (map)

CPCC employees may register for PD credit here.

Exhibition Reception

Date: November 14, 2017
Time: 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Location: Central Campus Library, 2nd Floor Atrium (map)

Veterans from all the wars since WWI: Korea, WWII, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan will share their personal perspectives on the lasting impact of war.

Dr. Brenda Tindal will facilitate discussion.

Brenda Tindal is staff historian at the Levine Museum of the New South. She received her bachelor’s degree in History and Africana Studies at UNC Charlotte in 2004, a master’s in American Studies at Emory University in 2005 and her Ph.D. in History and Culture within the Graduate Institute of Liberal Arts at Emory University.


This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of The Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.