Working with Adults

Effective Ways to Work with Adult Students

Be warm and friendly

  • Learn the students' names.
  • Show interest in what that do and tell you.
  • You are an important listener!

Encourage students to think

  • Give students plenty of time to answer questions.  Silence often means the student is organizing his or her thoughts.


Admit when you don't know an answer

  • Feel free to ask the students or instructors for help whenever you need it.


Encourage students

  • Use tact and positive comments.
  • Seek something worthy of a compliment, especially when a student is having difficulty.


Accept a student just as he or she is

  • Be as non-judgmental as possible.


Let students "talk out" problems

  • If a student is upset, you need not solve the problem; however be a good listener!


Honor confidentiality

  • Respect your student's privacy.  Do not share information with others.

 

Set realistic goals that are attainable for your student

Be flexible, maintain a sense of humor, and HAVE FUN!!!


*Adapted from materials provided by Generations Together, University of Pittsburgh, Center for Social and Urban Research


Characteristics of Adult Learners

Adult learners:

  • Are creative and adaptable.
  • Can be apprehensive or anxious.
  • Have outside responsibilities beyond tutoring sessions.
  • View themselves as responsible, self-directed, and independent.
  • Resent being treated like children.
  • Want practical lessons, satisfying personal goals.
  • Have varied life experiences.

 

**This list is Adapted from Tutor: A Collaborative Approach to Literacy Instruction, New Reader's Press, 1993, p. 24.

Effective Ways to Work with Adult Students

Be warm and friendly

  • Learn the students' names.
  • Show interest in what that do and tell you.
  • You are an important listener!

Encourage students to think

  • Give students plenty of time to answer questions.  Silence often means the student is organizing his or her thoughts.


Admit when you don't know an answer

  • Feel free to ask the students or instructors for help whenever you need it.


Encourage students

  • Use tact and positive comments.
  • Seek something worthy of a compliment, especially when a student is having difficulty.


Accept a student just as he or she is

  • Be as non-judgmental as possible.


Let students "talk out" problems

  • If a student is upset, you need not solve the problem; however be a good listener!


Honor confidentiality

  • Respect your student's privacy.  Do not share information with others.

 

Set realistic goals that are attainable for your student

Be flexible, maintain a sense of humor, and HAVE FUN!!!


*Adapted from materials provided by Generations Together, University of Pittsburgh, Center for Social and Urban Research


Characteristics of Adult Learners

Adult learners:

  • Are creative and adaptable.
  • Can be apprehensive or anxious.
  • Have outside responsibilities beyond tutoring sessions.
  • View themselves as responsible, self-directed, and independent.
  • Resent being treated like children.
  • Want practical lessons, satisfying personal goals.
  • Have varied life experiences.

 

**This list is Adapted from Tutor: A Collaborative Approach to Literacy Instruction, New Reader's Press, 1993, p. 24.