2004-2005 Accomplishments

College Goals and Accomplishments for 2004-2005


1. STUDENT SUCCESS
Goal: Ensure student success by all employees assuming collective responsibility for placing the needs of learners first.

  • CPCC awarded 919 degrees, 79 diplomas, 649 certificates, and 251 Adult High School diplomas.
  • The James J. and Angelia M. Harris Conference Center opened in January 2005.
  • The Charlotte Business Journal selected CPCC to receive its Diversity in Business Award for 2004.
  • Instructional Technology Services hired over 20 students optimizing student learning by utilizing Co-op Education program students in part-time open lab positions.
  • Information Technology Services implemented and integrated various College services using cost-effective technologies that produced rapid return on investment and minimal on-going costs including the implementation of the Student Portal which contributes to student success by consolidating College services with a single sign-on.
  • Facilities Services successfully responded to trouble calls within established timeframes 80% of the time.
  • Facilities Services ensured completion of the Academic and Performing Arts Center, Professional Development Building, North Campus Phase 3 and Forensics renovations, and Cato Campus Phase 2 within established time frames for the projects.
  • Library Services in cooperation with UNC developed and implemented a Library Instruction Tutorial that is available 24/7.
  • ESS increased online counseling by 47% and online advising by 200% compared to the same period last year by enhancing the Integrated Counseling and Advising Network (ICAN) website.
  • ESS expanded technology services for our disabled students on the CPCC home page.
  • ESS introduced the online interactive new student orientation and served more than 1,800 students.
  • ESS revised appropriate placement testing documents and resources to emphasize the importance of using the online ACCUPLACER study guide to prepare for the College’s placement tests.
  • Outreach and Recruitment staff are located at the area campuses to provide direct services to current and prospective students.
  • The Academic Learning Center (ALC), Career Counseling, and Disabilities Services departments were combined to maximize services provided to students at all campuses.
  • ESS developed a staff and student handbook which defines the policies and procedures to enhance services for deaf and hard of hearing students.
  • ESS coordinated registration services with the Business Office staff to maximize services to students.
  • ESS expanded student financial services and counseling services at each campus, and updated the website to provide details on scholarships.
  • ESS administered a pre-admission Learning and Study Strategies Inventory to all new students to help the staff determine what academic, counseling, or financial services students will need.
  • ESS increased CMS participation in the College Connection program by including three additional high schools.
  • ESS implemented all objectives and met or exceeded all established goals for year one of the Title III grant.
  • ESS successfully opened the first Student Success Center at Central Campus and made physical structural changes at the outlying campuses to provide a supportive and nurturing environment for current and prospective students.
  • Student Life sponsored and supported over 400 student programs.
  • Educational Talent Search provided nearly 800 program participants with an educational assessment and plan.
  • The Process Review Implementation Team developed and launched the online student schedule builder to facilitate students’ class planning and registration.
  • Classified Staff Council sponsored a retreat to support the Learning College initiative and to clarify the role played by each member of classified staff.
  • The American Association of Community Colleges selected Jennifer Taylor as the New Century Scholar for the state of North Carolina.
  • The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation selected CPCC student Athena Lapan as one of only 25 recipients of the most competitive scholarship available to community college students.
  • Presentation U. assisted instructors in converting course materials to CDs, saving over $2500 in copy costs. English, Reading, and Humanities Division revised the placement test to include a computer-evaluated writing sample which proved to increase the accuracy of student placement in subsequent classes.
  • English, Reading, and Humanities Division offered fourteen Learning Communities to increase student retention.
  • Foreign Language Division used smart classrooms to deliver instruction in the traditional classroom setting and converted all the language labs to online/web-assisted activities to expand opportunities for student learning and student services.
  • Math Division volunteered all full-time faculty in the Academic Learning Center as tutors and tutor trainers.
  • Behavioral and Social Sciences Division expanded on-line and hybrid course delivery.
  • American Academy of Applied Forensics implemented a marketing plan to build national awareness of program offerings.
  • Instructional Development offered online and face-to-face orientations for distance students.
  • Cooperative Education Division expanded opportunities for students to participate in cooperative education by including it in several new certificate programs.
  • Cooperative Education Division has options with over 550 employers in the Charlotte area for students to prepare for the workplace and developed new strategies for job development by offering new co-op opportunities in the manufacturing community at Duke Power Co, Siemens-Westinghouse, and various machining companies.
  • Short-term training grew the JumpStart Program and provided approximately 170 students scholarships in 8 program areas during the fall and spring semesters, and provided 45 scholarships to students in a new certificate geared to working with high- risk youth.
  • Basic Skills developed and promoted a more user friendly and accessible webpage to increase students’ success during the registration and orientation process.
  • Engineering Division completed projects from Siemens-Westinghouse on rapid prototyping and design consulting; from Precision Machine on parts manufacturing and measuring; and from Boston Gear on gear blanks, bringing real world experiences, projects, and corporate interactions to the classroom.
  • Applied Technologies Division partnered with AGC, IBEW, and ABC to host apprenticeship training at Harper Campus.
  • Applied Technologies Division implemented a program that provides direction for ESL students to pursue the Electrical/Electronics program.
  • Applied Technologies Division expanded short-term programs in Welding, Graphic Arts, and the Construction Institute for industry partners that provide entry-level skills to potential employees.
  • Information Technology and Engineering Divisions pursued the development of all courses to online and hybrid formats to increase access and provide alternatives to traditional courses, and developed and offered a number of new leading-edge courses in simulation and gaming.
  • Science Division expanded online course offerings in Human Anatomy and Physiology and hybridized courses in microbiology and geography to meet the student demand.
  • Basic Skills enrolled over 10,000 students and awarded GED and Adult High School diplomas to 892 students last year.


2. ORGANIZATIONAL & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Goal: Foster an organizational culture that makes learning the primary value in every action of the College.

  • CPCC conducted a Learning College Self-Assessment Initiative and presented the findings at six forums attended by nearly 400 employees.
  • Classified Staff Professional Development Day was attended by more than 200 employees.
  • Facilities Partners developed a plan for recommendations regarding facility space utilization goals in support of the learning environment.
  • Administrative Services offered classes through the Learner Web process.
  • Administrative Services continues to implement cross training, including the process with CPCC Foundation accounting.
  • Human Resources worked closely with the professional development group to implement changes to the New Employee Orientation process by offering a basic class and then a follow-up class for new employees.
  • Human Resources integrated leadership development and succession planning into CPCC Leads and the Manager’s Academy.
  • College’s mediation program was selected by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to pilot their new Referral Back Mediation Program.
  • Resource Development conducted 65 individual training workshops to discuss how to get started with grants development and responded to over 140 ideas presented by individuals seeking grant funding.
  • Resource Development provided tools to facilitate collaborative writing and planning processes for Grants Central.
  • The CPCC Foundation raised funds for and provided $50,000 to be utilized for faculty and staff development purposes.
  • Services Corporation launched three new projects, involving eight CPCC staff & faculty providing entrepreneurial opportunities to complement primary staff and faculty career objectives and facilitate overall professional growth and recognition.
  • Instructional Technology Services simplified the design of the smart classrooms to achieve ease of use for faculty, reduce the number of support calls, and reduce cost of consumables.
  • Library Services presented a Copyright/Copy Wrong Program with a national authority on copyright issues in education.
  • The Academic Learning Center staff received College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA) Level One Certification.
  • ESS completed all phases of research for and developed four advisor training courses.
  • ESS trained 30 faculty members how to increase integration of student learning styles and student success strategies into their teaching.
  • ESS disseminated the results of all Title III assessments to faculty and staff via the Online Student Profile.
  • ESS successfully implemented the Faculty Institute on Service-Learning, with 14 faculty participants involved in a three-day training program.
  • ESS developed a Customer Service Training course through CCE designed specifically for the Call Center staff who each completed 40 hours of customer service skills training.
  • Disabilities Services staff conducted a reorganization retreat in November 2004 to improve cross-training and departmental coordination.
  • ESS hosted the Counseling Division of the North Carolina Community College Student Development and Personnel Association conference and presented a workshop on service-learning.
  • Center for Leadership and Staff Development organized the participation in Spanish courses for 40 key front-line staff.
  • ESS organized a disabilities teleconference in fall 2004 open to the entire College community.
  • ESS conducted ACCUPLACER training for CMS personnel to be able to test graduating seniors enrolled in Career and Technical Education programs.
  • ESS provided College-wide training on the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) thorough workshops, electronic bulletins, and a dedicated FERPA website.
  • The Diversity Committee purchased and distributed world maps and posters on various aspects of diversity for display at each campus.
  • The Diversity Committee participated in new employee/faculty orientation to advance the mission and work of the committee.
  • ESS offered 23 diversity-themed programs at multiple campuses with 3,342 persons in attendance.
  • The Health Sciences Division in collaboration with Health and Safety developed a comprehensive and accessible professional development program including hazardous chemical training, blood borne pathogens training, needle stick prevention, and lab safety for full and part-time faculty.
  • Hospitality Education faculty attended The Culinary Institute of America World Flavors Conference.
  • English, Reading, and Humanities Division offered professional development opportunities for divisional part-time faculty with focus on the Learning College.
  • Foreign Languages Division offered and supported professional development programs and opportunities to enhance staff and faculty effectiveness as facilitators of learning through training in programs such as CAN-S, Quia, and the smart classroom.
  • Foreign Languages Division ensured that part-time employees are supported in facilitating a quality learning experience by requiring all full-time faculty to work at least one evening a week to ensure a point of contact for part-timers.
  • Business and Accounting Division provided orientation for part-time faculty with emphasis on the learning-college model.
  • Math Division provided orientation, support, and appreciation events for part-time faculty and devoted part of each division meeting to professional development centered on learning-college initiatives.
  • Behavioral and Social Sciences Division developed the Learning Squares peer-observation system to ensure a thematic learning community across ACA 111, developmental Reading and developmental English classes in response to the Title III grant.
  • Instructional Development revised faculty orientation to better reflect a learning-centered institution.
  • Instructional Development involved staff in learning a suite of products that enhance online instruction and keep faculty informed of new technologies to enrich and enhance the learning process.
  • Presentation U. offered workshops and services to train instructors how to offer alternative learning options to students.
  • Center for Leadership and Staff Development received the National Council of Instructional Administrators’ Exemplary Initiatives Award in the category of Organizational Change.
  • Center for Leadership and Staff Development created a new employee follow-up training session including an in-depth introduction to the learning-college concept.
  • Center for Transformational Learning staff visited two of the League of Innovation’s Vanguard Colleges to expand their understanding of various implementation processes for learning colleges.
  • Center for Transformational Learning formed a cross-unit advisory committee with four major subcommittees: Learning Outcomes, Learning Dialogues, Professional Development, and Employee Recruitment & Retention.
  • Center for Transformational Learning developed a learning-college implementation plan through 2006 beginning with 26 learning dialogues offered at all college campuses to over 400 college employees.
  • Information Technologies Division hosted communications training for NCCCS instructors through the Electronics CIP on new and emerging technology.
  • Information Technologies Division received the Department of Labor Geospatial grant to offer training on leading-edge technologies.
  • Applied Technologies Division created a new course in Welding Technology focusing on the properties of exotic metals and added new technologies to facilitate learning by completing a migration of all electrical labs from hardcopy to digital format.
  • Science Division faculty explored biotechnology and bioinformatics as emerging branches of science, especially focusing on proteins.


3. COMMUNITY/ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & PARTNERSHIPS
Goal: Promote the health and economic vitality of the community through partnerships, coalitions, and collaborations.

  • CPCC received national recognition as the recipient of the 2005 Community College National Center for Community Engagement Collaboration Award in the K-12 category.
  • CPCC broke ground for the Joe Hendrick Center for Automotive Technology at the Levine Campus, a partnership with the Hendrick Automotive Group to build an automotive training center.
  • Colleague Training Center development team held meetings with NCCCS and ACS representatives to develop training materials and implement the process of training at NCCCS.
  • Resource Development developed 17 collaborative proposals involving 38 business, industry, and educational partners.
  • Center for Applied Research submitted 15 collaborative proposals with community agencies and workforce partners, including universities and community colleges, the Mental Health Association, the Chamber of Commerce, United Way, the Metrolina Regional Scholars Academy, the Housing Authority, and the Charlotte Advocates for Education.
  • ESS worked with the Diversity Committee to establish Teletypewriter Technology sites and training for security and staff at various campuses.
  • ESS assisted CPCC Interpreting Training Program in hosting the Deaf Literacy Festival by marketing, participating, and providing financial support from grant monies.
  • ESS secured grant funding and initiated two civic engagement projects: Project VOTE and the Martin Luther King Challenge.
  • Service Learning Program participants completed 10,000 hours of service to the community involving 32 instructors, 500 students, and 210 community organizations.
  • ESS implemented the NC ACTS! Program, involving 10 CPCC students in 300 hours of service which will secure a $1000 educational grant for each student to use in 2005-06.
  • ESS initiated aggressive outreach and recruitment activities for Adult High School Diploma and General Educational Development students by offering weekly admissions and financial aid workshops.
  • Career Services redesigned the Partners Program to offer recruitment opportunities for additional employers.
  • ESS expanded testing partnerships in support of CPCC Instruction and CCE through collaboration with professional testing organizations such as ACT, ETS, Prometric, and the College Board.
  • Human Services Gerontology faculty designed training modules to meet the educational needs of Southminster Retirement Community facility employees.
  • Human Services Developmental Disabilities faculty worked with the Rehabilitation Research Training Center at Virginia Commonwealth University to develop a national webcast on staff development in Supported Employment.
  • Nursing faculty developed goals, objectives, and a timeline for a strategic plan designed to address student retention and graduation rate.
  • Nursing and Health Sciences organized a Regional Healthcare Consortium including area community colleges and workforce development representatives to address the nursing and health science professional shortages.
  • Hospitality Education students were actively involved in the Charlotte Hospice/Soup on Sunday fundraiser hosted by the CPCC students and faculty.
  • Hospitality Education students and faculty partnered with community agencies including the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Restaurant Association, International Food Service Executives’ Association, and Second Harvest Food Bank of Metrolina to hold fundraising dinners.
  • The Hospitality Education Division shared their culinary expertise by hosting private lunches for Charlotte community groups including four Charlotte Mecklenburg High School culinary classes, and Plantation Estates and Cypress of Charlotte retirement centers.
  • English, Reading, and Humanities Division supported the CPCC Spring Literary Festival throughout the academic year.
  • Foreign Languages Division established community/business partnerships in the learning process by offering Spanish for Healthcare Professionals online to employees of Presbyterian Hospital, Carolinas Medical Center, and Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools.
  • Business and Accounting Division sponsored a chapter of Students in Free Enterprise.
  • Math Division held the 2nd Future Teacher Conference at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte which was attended by more than 100 area high school students.
  • Public Safety completed a project on research and standards development in digital evidence training with The National Institute of Standards and Technology.
  • Transport Systems Technology faculty completed the integration of BMW, GM, Toyota, and Daimler-Chrysler curriculum into automotive courses and marketing materials to strengthen and satisfy partnership requirements.
  • Transport Systems Technology faculty invited business leaders from Meritor, Eaton, and MGM Brakes to speak to college experience classes regarding career opportunities in the transportation field.
  • Transport Systems Technology faculty completed the programming phase planning for the Joe Hendrick Center for Automotive Technology.
  • Transport Systems Technology faculty formed a partnership in the Heavy Equipment area with Cummins resulting in obtaining new engines, Carolina Tractor which donated $50,000 for equipment, and a new partnership with BMW resulting in the donation of six BMW vehicles for student training.
  • Transport Systems Technology faculty established outreach to North Mecklenburg County automotive dealerships in anticipation of spring 2006 opening of North Phase III.
  • Cooperative High School Programs expanded outreach initiatives to CMS through the Early College Program at Waddell High School; the Information Technology Academy; and the Law, Public Safety, and Homeland Security Academy.
  • Cooperative High School Programs expanded and improved outreach initiatives to the home school community, providing them student enrichment opportunities.
  • Cooperative High School Programs awarded over 50 students $1000 Scholarships from College Tech Prep, Academy of Finance, College Experience, and Technical Programs Scholarships.
  • Short-term training program worked with the CPCC Foundation to increase outside funding for JumpStart and increased the curriculum options to unemployed and underemployed citizens by developing 27 new curriculum program certificates for short-term training opportunities at CPCC.
  • CCE built a market bundle of products for the baby-boomer and retirement-age markets called the Lifelong Learning Institute and planned a Regional Explorations course focusing on Italy for fall 2005.
  • CCE formed a partnership to deliver a training series of six sessions under Charlotte Chamber sponsorship for small business.
  • CCE completed the re-design of the mortgage curriculum, and developed a partnership with United Guaranty, which enhanced practical application of the mortgage loan process.
  • CCE developed and implemented a Six Sigma Black Belt exam prep course.
  • CCE developed an Introduction to Wireless Networking class in computer training.
  • Basic Skills developed and implemented an ESL Pathways program in the Electrical area in conjunction with Technical Careers.
  • Engineering Division developed a working relationship with business partners to upgrade and revise the Information Systems curriculum to make it a viable transfer program with articulation agreements with the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Appalachian State University.
  • Technical Careers partnered with electrical industry agencies to implement an electrical apprenticeship program.
  • Information Technologies continued to work with Phillip O. Berry Academy of Technology on the College and Career Transitions Initiative grant by teaching dual enrollment classes at the high school and training their instructors.
  • The Institute for Entrepreneurship and Small Business was launched to expand educational opportunities for the community.


4. INSTITUTIONAL GROWTH
Goal: Plan and coordinate student enrollment, programs, services, and facilities to meet community needs.

  • Facilities Partners evaluated and updated the College’s 10-year Capital Needs Assessment plan to determine recommendations for Cabinet, the Board of Trustees, and the County Commissioners.
  • CPCC Foundation provided for increased student access by securing over $300,000 in expendable and endowed support for scholarships and over $7 million in scholarship support through the Capital Campaign.
  • Instructional Technology Services created and supported a delivery platform for CCE and other entrepreneurial programs through a reliable and cost effective Learning Management System saving the College $70,000 for the first year.
  • ESS expanded the College Connection program to now include 16 CMS high schools and presented 108 scholarships at CMS Senior Award nights.
  • ESS increased the number and frequency of communication pieces sent to prospective students and their parents. Student Support Services program improved retention rates of students participating to 54% for the academic year with 88% of this group in good academic standing.
  • ESS participated with ITS to develop a plan to retain current course/block permissions in Colleague which are essential for success of online registration services.
  • ESS served 800 students through the Education Talent Search Program, which includes primarily Low Income/ First Generation participants.
  • 94% of Education Talent Search participants in grades 6-11 completed the school year and advanced to the next grade, and 85% of grade 12 participants entered postsecondary programs.
  • ESS ensured that CPCC is represented at over 45 international college search sites in Asia/Pacific and Latin America in their native language.
  • 100% of continuing high school students participating in the Upward Bound program during the program year were promoted to the next grade, and 100% of seniors participating in the program graduated.
  • Basic Skills restructured their curriculum and methodologies to include delivery of high quality distance education programs in GED and Adult High School.


5. INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT
Goal: Increase available public and private funds for educational programs, capital projects, and general operations.

  • The Association of Community College Trustees selected Dr. Zeiss for its National Chief Executive Award for 2004.
  • CPCC renamed the Northeast Campus the Cato Campus in honor of Wayland Cato Jr., a longtime supporter of the College.
  • CPCC Foundation secured over $12 million in commitments toward the $15 million goal for the Capital Campaign.
  • Resource Development coordinated 43 cross-functional and cross- institutional development teams in preparing grant proposals. Ninety-four percent of notifications this fiscal year have been positive, with $4,694,450 awarded to CPCC and its business and education partners.
  • Department of Education appropriated $500,000 for the GIS Training Center.
  • Resource Development coordinated five meetings with representatives from the Department of Labor and the Department of Homeland Security to discuss specific ideas for regional and national funding for CPCC.
  • The CPCC Foundation has identified potential donors to support entrepreneurial initiatives.
  • CPCC’s Scholarship committee awarded over $884,000 to 1705 students.
  • Financial Aid facilitated the awarding of Federal Pell Grants to nearly 4000 students for a total of over $8,000,000.
  • Library Services received a $20,000 grant from the state library to strengthen the CPCC’s ESL collection.
  • Center for Applied Research received $93,000 in contracts.
  • Service-Learning program trained and assigned duties to Volunteers in Service to America member Aimee Brunton to help build the capacity of the program.
  • Harris Conference Center implemented an aggressive marketing strategy that included print, electronic, and radio advertising as well as networking activities and direct sales efforts.
  • Harris Conference Center welcomed nearly 4000 guests in its first four months of operation, far exceeded its revenue forecast, and earned a 9.475 out of 10 score for client satisfaction.
  • Instructional Technology Services implemented a student print management system to reduce and control costs. Hospitality Education Division offered New Charlotte Cook classes through CCE for the home gourmet to integrate the program into the community and generate income.
  • Hospitality Education Division hosted International Sommelier Guild courses to increase the professionalism of the local restaurant industry and generate income.
  • Transport Systems Technology faculty secured additional scholarships for their students through area Maintenance Council, Chrysler, and General Motor’s minority student scholarship program.
  • Applied Technologies received division scholarships from Lowe’s, Harper Corporation, NAWIC, NARI, NC Masonry Association, ASA, and Carrier.


6. INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS
Goal: Improve learning outcomes and College programs, processes, and services through a systematic and continuous process of planning, assessment, and improvement.

  • The CPCC Foundation raised over $12 million during the capital campaign in order to support the budgetary needs of the College, to assist in the formulation of long-range planning, and to support the strategic needs of the College.
  • Compliance and Reporting office staff conducted refresher training to faculty and staff members on meeting State/Federal goals and LEIS accountability standards.
  • Health and Safety performed two comprehensive safety inspections to identify and correct recognized risk exposures.
  • Health and Safety has implemented a safety reward program to recognize employees who consistently utilize safe work practices.
  • Health and Safety inspected hazardous waste accumulation areas and waste streams to ensure adherence to EPA/DENR regulations on a weekly basis.
  • Health and Safety investigated alleged occupational injuries to identify root causes and generate future preventive measure recommendations.
  • Compliance and Audit updated and executed the Internal Audit Plan.
  • Information Technology Services enhanced the help desk’s technology portfolio through newer technology service request tracking.
  • Administrative Services enhanced the management information system to provide tools for budgeting and control of financial resources including the XDBR-Custom Report for Departmental Budget, a simplified tool for budget managers, and the customized 2R02, a Comparative/ Current Year Budget Data report.
  • Library Services updated 55 computers, added 15 computers for student use, and added 20,000 electronic books to the catalog based on LibQual survey results.
  • Human Resources evaluated and implemented Segal Compensation Study recommendation guidelines with a plan for systematic updates.
  • Administrative Services conducted its periodic annual review to assess service perceptions of those served and to determine future needs.
  • Financial Services continued the implementation of Datatel system software to promote reliable services for students and staff on the AR/CR module for Colleague.
  • Administrative Services and ESS examined student service processes for potential student time savings through the combination of student registration and payment functions.
  • Auxiliary Services increased used book sales to 24% of total book sales through promotional signage, broadcast emails, and faculty participation.
  • Administrative Services enhanced the distribution of the parking permit with additional distribution points and new parking literature.
  • Administrative Services created a Facilities Rental website, increased facility rentals and continued efforts to promote leased space that is appropriate for the students, College, and community with an increase in facility rental revenue.
  • The Advisement Management Team implemented a three-year assessment plan focused on measuring the effectiveness of the advisement process for the College.
  • The Advisement Management Team completed plans for the Transfer Resource Center to assist students who are preparing to transfer to four-year institutions.
  • The General Education Committee piloted assessment of the Critical Thinking goal.
  • The Institutional Effectiveness Committee reviewed the Institutional Effectiveness plan for the College and the new Southern Association of Colleges and Schools criteria.
  • ESS conducted a survey of recent certificate graduates to measure the efficiency of the certificate graduation process and students’ level of satisfaction with it.
  • ESS developed and implemented a new graduation process for potential Adult High School students, which was specifically designed to address the unique needs of this group.
  • ESS established a framework to establish learning outcomes and utilize assessment results to improve services for students.
  • ESS developed and implemented a web-based Student Evaluation of Service-Learning, a Community Partner Evaluation of Service-Learning, and a Faculty Institute on Service-Learning.
  • ESS conducted a unit-wide analysis of each department to ensure that systematic assessments are in place.
  • Health Sciences Division received successful onsite accreditation visits for the Cytotechnology program for seven years and the Physical Therapist Assistant program for ten years.
  • Human Services faculty redeveloped the graduate evaluation tool to measure program success and graduate progress in their education and careers.
  • Instructional Development continued the Summer Institute for Distance Education to promote the development of online courses concentrated on areas in need of strengthening their online offerings.
  • Applied Technologies conducted meetings with advisory committees to evaluate the curriculum’s impact regarding workforce preparation, and the committees’ recommendations have been implemented in the existing programs.
  • Engineering Division created an environment of continuous improvement by evaluating projects and making adjustments to improve them as demonstrated in the ABET Reaccredidation process.
  • Harper Campus faculty and staff organized and installed eight “Wall of Success” photographs of students and related success stories at Harper Campus to support student recruitment and retention.
  • Information Technologies partnered with Information Technology Services to develop a multi-media lab for faculty development and experimentation with new technologies to improve learning.